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Videos uploaded by user “University of Kent”
Considering a PhD? | Tips on selecting a supervisor, writing a proposal and applying
 
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How should you approach a supervisor? What do they look for in a candidate and an application? How should you apply? University of Kent academics Dr Heejung Chung, Dr Dan Lloyd and Professor Paul Allain offer their tips and advice. ► Search for a supervisor at Kent: http://bit.ly/2eONXWP ► Find a PhD: http://bit.ly/2ef8DYG
Views: 21596 University of Kent
Turing College accommodation
 
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Find out about Turing College accommodation. The one that is named after the famous code breaker.
Views: 21030 University of Kent
Fine Art interview and portfolio advice
 
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In this video our Fine Art lecturers and students provide some advice on how to prepare your portfolio of work.
Views: 54302 University of Kent
Our Canterbury campus | University of Kent
 
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Have a look at our beautiful Canterbury campus, there are so many facilities including a nightclub, theatre and cinema all on campus!
Views: 9392 University of Kent
Law students: Introducing the University of Kent's Canterbury campus
 
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Kent Law School students explaining what it is like to study on the University of Kent's Canterbury campus. Kent Law School - http://www.kent.ac.uk/law/
Views: 33530 University of Kent
Keynes College - the one with the duck pond
 
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Find out more about Keynes College self-catered en-suite accommodation. For students based in a Keynes Flat accommodation blocks are formed with eight single en-suite rooms and a shared self-catered kitchen.
Views: 18004 University of Kent
10 Commandments of Being A Successful Scientist | Professor Darren Griffin | Think Kent
 
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THINK KENT – INTERNATIONAL THINKERS | GLOBAL IMPACT Some believe that the successful are simply "lucky”, but what is luck? Luck, some define, is when preparation meets opportunity. Darren Griffin, Professor of Genetics at the University of Kent, shares some words of wisdom on how to become a successful scientist.  His 10 commandments of being a successful scientist has been presented in the Nature blog, in the American Chemical Society webinar series and in numerous venues locally, nationally and internationally. ► SEARCH for a course at the University of Kent: http://bit.ly/225xP56 ► Research at Kent: http://bit.ly/1WekxMT ► SUBSCRIBE for more Think Kent lectures: http://www.youtube.com/user/UniversityofKent?sub_confirmation=1 ABOUT PROFESSOR DARREN GRIFFIN Professor Griffin is a world leader in cytogenetics (the study of chromosomes). Highlights of his achievements include the first successful cytogenetic diagnosis of an IVF embryo, the establishment of a paternal age effect for cytogenetic abnormalities, definition of the first complete cytogenetic constitution of a bird and, most recently, a significant role in the development of a universal test for any genetic disease in IVF embryos. He has, throughout his academic career, been a champion of the role of research in informing high quality teaching and amassed an impressive publication record in the development, application and evaluation of eLearning. He is a prolific science communicator, making every effort to make scientific research publicly accessible (both his own and others) and is an enthusiastic proponent for the benefits of interdisciplinary research endeavour. The purpose of the work in Professor Griffin’s laboratory is to link cytogenetic studies in individual patients with those occurring during evolution, not only describing cytogenetic abnormalities but providing underlying biological reasons why they occur. The work aims to understand the role of cytogenetics in the earliest stages of mammalian development (sperm, eggs, embryos) and how that drives evolution. Far from focussing on narrow objectives however Professor Griffin uses his research activity as a base to facilitate wider university engagement in the field of reproduction. Specifically, to create a unique multi-disciplinary academic activity with an outward-facing international profile, linking such diverse disciplines as Biosciences, Anthropology, Conservation, Psychology, Art, Philosophy, Social Policy and The Law. He is thus Director of the University’s Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies of Reproduction (CISoR), which comprises several like-minded academics dedicated to the study of reproduction in all its forms.   Professor Griffin is President of the International Chromosome and Genome Society. He is also a Fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists, of the Royal Society of Biology, and the Royal Society of Arts, Manufacture and Commerce. ► Find out more about Professor Darren Griffin: http://bit.ly/1LWpOIm Find the University of Kent on social media: ► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UniversityofKent ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/unikent ► Instagram: https://instagram.com/unikentlive/ ► LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/university-of-kent
Views: 16540 University of Kent
Guide to Arrivals Weekend at Canterbury
 
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Quick guide to the things you must do when you arrive on the Canterbury campus. Find out more at: www.kent.ac.uk/gettingstarted View the video script at: http://www.kent.ac.uk/student/arrivals-video-script.pdf
Views: 13927 University of Kent
Mind over muscle? Limits to Endurance Performance | Professor Samuele Marcora | Think Kent
 
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THINK KENT – INTERNATIONAL THINKERS | GLOBAL IMPACT Muscle fatigue due to limited oxygen delivery and lactic acid accumulation is thought to set the speed an endurance athlete can sustain during a competition (e.g. the marathon). This is because above that speed, muscle fatigue would develop too quickly and the athlete would reach exhaustion before the finish line. In this lecture, Professor Samuele Marcora from the University of Kent challenges this physiological model of endurance performance, and proposes an alternative model in which perception of effort and motivation are the main factors determining endurance performance. He also discusses how this psychobiological model can be used to develop innovative interventions aimed at further improving endurance performance. ► SEARCH for a course at the University of Kent: http://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=MarcoraSearch&utm_campaign=ThinkKent1516 ► Research at Kent: https://www.kent.ac.uk/research/?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=MarcoraResearch&utm_campaign=ThinkKent1516 ► Study at our Medway campus: https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway ► SUBSCRIBE for more Think Kent lectures: http://www.youtube.com/user/UniversityofKent?sub_confirmation=1 ABOUT PROFESSOR SAMUELE MARCORA Twitter: @SamueleMarcora Professor Samuele Marcora received his Bachelor in Physical Education from the State University of Milan (Italy). He then studied for an MSc in Human Performance at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse (USA), and for a PhD in Clinical Exercise Physiology at the University of Wales-Bangor (UK). After a successful academic career at Bangor University, Professor Marcora began his post as Director of Research at the University of Kent at the end of 2010. His role is to stimulate, coordinate, monitor and assess all research activity within the School of Sport and Exercise Sciences. In 2006, Professor Marcora changed his research direction and decided to integrate exercise physiology with motivation psychology and cognitive neuroscience. This psychobiological approach has generated several innovative studies including the effects of mental fatigue on endurance performance and brain training for endurance athletes (Brain Endurance Training). Professor Marcora had been research consultant for MAPEI Sport Service in Italy where he contributed to highly cited research on football and mountain biking physiology. In his spare time, Professor Marcora enjoys riding his two motorbikes. In 2013, he completed a gruelling 3-month ride from London to Beijing through Central Asia and Tibet to investigate fatigue in motorbike riders. If you are interested in Professor Marcora's research on fatigue in motorbike riders, you can listen to his recent interview on Adventure Rider Radio (http://www.adventureriderradio.com/adventure-rider-radio-episodes/2015/5/14/sam-marcora-rider-fatigue-what-motorcyclists-have-in-common-with-soldiers) ► Find out more about Professor Samuele Marcora: https://www.kent.ac.uk/sportsciences/staff/academic/s-marcora.html?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=MarcoraProfile&utm_campaign=ThinkKent1516 Find the University of Kent on social media: ► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UniversityofKent ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/unikent ► Instagram: https://instagram.com/unikentlive/ ► LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/university-of-kent
Views: 19262 University of Kent
Phill Jupitus - When Do I Get the Prescription Pad?
 
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Phill Jupitus received an honorary degree from the University of Kent in July 2017. For the special occasion, he wrote and performed a poem.
Views: 4869 University of Kent
Optimising Endurance Performance & Training in Elite Cyclists | Professor Louis Passfield
 
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THINK KENT – INTERNATIONAL THINKERS | GLOBAL IMPACT Professor Louis Passfield, Head of the School of Sport and Exercise Sciences at the University of Kent, and lead scientist with the highly successful British Cycling team that prepared for the Barcelona, Atlanta and Beijing Olympic Games, discusses his research in endurance performance and the training of elite cyclists. Cycling is an excellent sport for scientists as it is possible to attach devices directly to a rider's bicycle to measure exactly how hard he or she is working. These power meters provide an accurate, reliable and detailed measurement of the work done by the cyclist during training and competition. Analysis of this data enables the demands of cycle training and races to be accurately quantified. Strategies for optimising race performance can also be devised and evaluated. The major challenge for sports scientists in the future is to determine whether the riders’ training can be programmed from a scientific basis and optimised to ensure maximum performance. ► SEARCH for a course at the University of Kent: http://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=PassfieldSearch&utm_campaign=ThinkKent1516 ► Study at our Medway campus: https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway ► Research at Kent: https://www.kent.ac.uk/research/?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=PassfieldResearch&utm_campaign=ThinkKent1516 ► SUBSCRIBE for more Think Kent lectures: http://www.youtube.com/user/UniversityofKent?sub_confirmation=1 ABOUT PROFESSOR LOUIS PASSFIELD Professor Passfield has been Head of the School of Sport & Exercise Sciences at the University of Kent since 2007 and before this worked as a sports scientist with British Cycling. Louis leads the school's Professional Doctorate programme. He is also an affiliate member of SHARP. Louis completed both his Sports Science BSc and PhD at the University of Brighton. His expertise is in training, high performance and applied sports science. Throughout his career, Louis has worked both as an applied sports scientist and an academic. Louis has a 25-year track record of applied work in cycling, and with British Cycling in particular. He has worked as lead sports scientist with the highly successful British Cycling team preparing for a number of major events including 1992 Barcelona, 1996 Atlanta, and 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. Over this time Louis has been part of several gold medal teams and has worked with many of Britain’s most successful riders and coaches. Louis has also coached Olympic, World Championship and Commonwealth Games cyclists, including the Great Britain team pursuit and England team time-trial teams. Louis has given invited lectures on his applied sports science and research work in the UK and at international conferences. Although still a keen cyclist, Louis mostly runs to keep fit these days. He has also written a book on Training with Power Meters. Additionally, Louis is an external member of the Statistics in Sports & Health Group at University College London. ► Find out more about Professor Louis Passfield: https://www.kent.ac.uk/sportsciences/staff/l-passfield.html?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=PassfieldProfile&utm_campaign=ThinkKent1516 Find the University of Kent on social media: ► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UniversityofKent ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/unikent ► Instagram: https://instagram.com/unikentlive/ ► LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/university-of-kent
Views: 29580 University of Kent
Winner of 2014 YouTube Challenge
 
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Kent student, Adam Latham, summarises why he loves the University of Kent. The winning entry for the You Tube challenge.
Views: 8481 University of Kent
Negotiating with terrorists - an alternative path to security? | Dr Harmonie Toros | Think Kent
 
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► SEARCH for a course at the University of Kent: http://bit.ly/2eztFv6 ► Research at Kent: http://bit.ly/2fyMW2j ► SUBSCRIBE for more Think Kent lectures: http://www.youtube.com/user/UniversityofKent?sub_confirmation=1 THINK KENT – INTERNATIONAL THINKERS | GLOBAL IMPACT Terrorism is identified by most states and international organisations as one of the main security threats facing us all. In this talk, Dr Harmonie Toros, winner of the 2017 Sir Bernard Crick Prize for Outstanding Teaching, explores how, contrary to a widely held public and official view, negotiations may be a sound policy option in responding to terrorist violence. She argues that the main arguments used against “negotiating with terrorists” - that it would legitimise terrorists and delegitimise the state, and that it is too complex - are often not insurmountable obstacles. Negotiations in fact do often lead to a political solution to terrorist conflicts and recent research demonstrates that political solutions are the most effective at bringing an end to terrorist violence.  ABOUT DR HARMONIE TOROS Harmonie Toros’ research lies at the crossroad between conflict resolution/conflict transformation, peace studies, and terrorism studies. She has published seminal work developing a critical theory-based approach to terrorism and examining the strengths and weaknesses of negotiating with groups who use terrorist violence. Her work on negotiations, based on fieldwork in Northern Ireland and the Philippines, is being used by governments and international organisations to expand their policy options beyond military and police counter-terrorism. She is a member of the Global Research Network of the United Nations Counter-Terrorism Executive Directorate, and regularly lectures on courses for military and security officers of NATO and other countries. She is also editor of Critical Studies on Terrorism (http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rter20/current), the key journal developing critical approaches to terrorism.  ► Find out more about Dr Harmonie Toros: http://bit.ly/2fjmN6L Find the University of Kent on social media: ► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UniversityofKent ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/unikent ► Instagram: https://instagram.com/unikentlive/ ► LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/university-of-kent
Views: 3876 University of Kent
Gavin Esler In Conversation with Sandi Toksvig
 
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On Tuesday 4 October, the second series of In Conversation began at the University of Kent. Gavin Esler was joined by Sandi Toksvig OBE for an evening of conversation... with laughter aplenty! Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/events/in-conversation/index.html
Views: 15934 University of Kent
Gavin Esler In Conversation with Mark Kermode
 
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Saturday 23 January saw the visit of Mark Kermode to the University of Kent's Canterbury campus. The University Chancellor, Gavin Esler, welcomed Mark to the University in front of a packed-out Woolf Lecture Theatre.
Views: 29511 University of Kent
Gavin Esler In Conversation with Jo Brand
 
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*The recording of this event contains strong language. Viewer discretion is advised* We hosted In Conversation with Jo Brand at the University of Kent on 28 February 2017. For more information about the series and to find out who's up next in the series, please visit www.kent.ac.uk/events Proceeds from ticket sales went to the Kent Opportunity Fund, supporting our students: https://www.kent.ac.uk/giving/opportunityfund/
Views: 8445 University of Kent
Locations and facilities - University of Kent
 
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Kent is the UK's European university - take a look at the locations and excellent facilities Kent students enjoy at our campuses and centres in Canterbury, Medway, Brussels, Tonbridge and Paris. Find out more about University of Kent locations - http://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/
Views: 19880 University of Kent
Study in the UK - University of Kent (US students)
 
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The University of Kent is a leading UK university and a popular choice for US students. Discover what two of our students enjoy about studying at Kent and living in the UK. Find out more at http://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent
Views: 29130 University of Kent
The Madness of King George: the medical mystery | Professor Martin Warren | Think Kent
 
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THINK KENT – INTERNATIONAL THINKERS | GLOBAL IMPACT Professor Martin Warren, BBSRC Professorial Fellow and Professor of Biochemistry and Head of School at the University of Kent, discusses the use of advanced forensic techniques to uncover the truth of King George III’s madness. Did the King suffer with a rare inherited and incurable blood disorder called porphyria? Why did it affect him at a relatively late age, why was it so severe, and could it have been passed onto his descendants? ► SEARCH for a course at the University of Kent: http://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=WarrenSearch&utm_campaign=ThinkKent1516 ► Research at Kent: https://www.kent.ac.uk/research/?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=WarrenResearch&utm_campaign=ThinkKent1516 ► SUBSCRIBE for more Think Kent lectures: http://www.youtube.com/user/UniversityofKent?sub_confirmation=1 ABOUT PROFESSOR MARTIN WARREN Professor Warren joined the School of Biosciences at the University of Kent in 2005. He is a member of the Industrial Biotechnology and Synthetic Biology Group and the Centre for Molecular Processing. He led the research that recently revealed how vitamin B12/antipernicious anaemia factor is made – a challenge often referred to as ‘the Mount Everest of biosynthetic problems’. The research team hopes that this newly-acquired information can be used to help persuade bacteria to make the vitamin in larger quantities, contributing to its use, for example, in medication for people suffering with the blood disorder pernicious anaemia. He has published numerous articles on tetrapyrrole biosynthesis and the biochemistry underlying inherited retinopathies, as well as co-authoring a popular book on the link between tetrapyrrole biosynthesis and the madness of George III. Martin was born in Northern Ireland, brought up in County Down, and went to Portora Royal School, Enniskillen. He subsequently went to Southampton University where he read Biochemistry as an undergraduate (1981-1984). He stayed on in the Biochemistry Department to do a PhD with Professor Peter Shoolingin-Jordan, which initiated his interest in the genetics and biochemistry of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis. After completing his PhD studies, he moved in 1989 to Texas A & M University, where he worked as a research associated with Professor Ian Scott FRS on vitamin B12 biosynthesis. In 1991 he took up a lecturing position in the School of Biological Sciences at Queen Mary, University of London, where he stayed until 1995 when he moved to a Senior Lecturer position at the Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London. He was promoted to Reader of Biochemistry in 1998 but then moved back to the School of Biological Sciences at Queen Mary in 1999 to take up a Personal Chair. In 2005 he moved to the University of Kent, where he is Professor of Biochemistry. In 2007 he was awarded a BBSRC Professorial Fellowship to work on the bioengineering of complex metabolic pathways. ► Find out more about Professor Martin Warren: https://www.kent.ac.uk/bio/profiles/staff/warren.html?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=WarrenProfile&utm_campaign=ThinkKent1516 Find the University of Kent on social media: ► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UniversityofKent ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/unikent ► Instagram: https://instagram.com/unikentlive/ ► LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/university-of-kent
Views: 6141 University of Kent
Gavin Esler In Conversation with Ian Rankin
 
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On Saturday 7 November 2015, the University's Chancellor, Gavin Esler, welcomed Ian Rankin OBE to the University for the second 'In Conversation' of the 2015/16 academic year. For more information about the series and events at the University of Kent, please visit http://www.kent.ac.uk/events/
Views: 2884 University of Kent
Gavin Esler In Conversation with David Suchet
 
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David Suchet CBE is an actor, playing roles on the stage, on television and in films for over 40 years. Series three continued with a special episode of In Conversation on Friday 3 November 2017 in the Colyer-Fergusson Concert Hall, where Gavin questioned David on everything from finding his voice, how he developed and transformed into his characters, and what Agatha Christie’s family thought of his portrayal of Poirot.
Views: 18594 University of Kent
Study in the UK - University of Kent (Chinese students)
 
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Find out what two of our Chinese students enjoy about studying at Kent and living in the UK. Find out more at http://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/country/pages/china.html
Views: 8415 University of Kent
Kent Uni is...
 
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Eleven students talk about why they love the University of Kent. The winning entry for the Kent Round One YouTube competition, this film was produced by four students of the University of Kent, and features animation so breath-taking that it will blow your mind... ...Well we think so anyway. Go to the University of Kent - http://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/
Views: 17613 University of Kent
The future of quantum computing
 
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Carlos A. Perez-Delgado, a lecturer in Computer Science explores the uses of quantum computing. Google, Intel, IBM, NEC: these are just a few of the large, well-known companies that have announced large investments, and accomplishments, towards building large-scale quantum computers. But, what is a quantum computer? In this general audience talk we will discuss what quantum computers are, how they work, and why we need to pay attention. Carlos has over 10 years research experience in quantum computation. He holds a PhD from the Institute for Quantum Computing at the University of Waterloo, in Canada. He was previously affiliated with the Centre for Quantum Technologies at the National University of Singapore, in Singapore. His current research focus is on applications of quantum computation to cybersecurity. ► SEARCH for a course at the University of Kent: http://bit.ly/2CUKLkF ► Research at Kent: http://bit.ly/2jbvZgS
Views: 1876 University of Kent
Canterbury campus drone tour
 
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Footage taken during summer 2018 of the University's Canterbury campus. https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/canterbury/
Views: 3869 University of Kent
University sponsored award for Orlando Bloom
 
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Orlando Bloom has been named Kent's Cultural Icon by overwhelming public vote in the Canterbury Cultural Awards 2014, sponsored by the University of Kent.
Views: 3973 University of Kent
Meet the 2016-17 Fulbright Scholar
 
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Shannon Laribo is the 2016/17 Fulbright and University of Kent in America Scholar, here at the University of Kent. She explains what brought her to Kent, and why the scholarship is so important to her. For more about scholars at Kent and supporting our students, please visit www.kent.ac.uk/giving
Views: 2971 University of Kent
What's it like studying Architecture at Kent?
 
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Our past students from the Kent School of Architecture talk about their courses and experiences of studying here.
Views: 10877 University of Kent
Gavin Esler In Conversation with Bernard Cornwell
 
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Bernard Cornwell OBE joined Gavin Esler for the third In Conversation of series two, on 17 October 2016. For more info and to find out about forthcoming events, please visit www.kent.ac.uk/events
Views: 8467 University of Kent
Domestic Violence Prevention? | Dr Marian Duggan | Think Kent
 
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THINK KENT – INTERNATIONAL THINKERS | GLOBAL IMPACT In this talk, Dr Marian Duggan discusses her current research project which is an analysis of how the Domestic Violence Disclosure Scheme (also known as ‘Clare’s Law’) is operating in Kent. Billed by the Government as a domestic violence ‘prevention policy’ and regularly referred to in the media as a ‘success’, she evaluates exactly how this scheme is operating in practice, whether it is achieving its aims of violence prevention and how useful a tool it is in reducing the average of two women a week who are killed in the UK as a result of domestic violence. ► SEARCH for a course at the University of Kent: http://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=DugganSearch&utm_campaign=ThinkKent1516 ► Research at Kent: https://www.kent.ac.uk/research/?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=DugganResearch&utm_campaign=ThinkKent1516 ► SUBSCRIBE for more Think Kent lectures: http://www.youtube.com/user/UniversityofKent?sub_confirmation=1 ABOUT DR MARIAN DUGGAN Marian became inspired during her own undergraduate criminology studies to ‘be the change you wish to see’. This has resulted in over a decade of playing an active role in community efforts to recognise, respond to and ultimately reduce victimisation on the basis of gender and/or sexuality. This activity feeds directly into her teaching on the gender, crime and victimisation modules, as well as underpinning her research interests in these areas. From studying the nature and impact of homophobia in post-conflict Northern Ireland through to the increasingly bureaucratised treatment of vulnerable victims in the UK criminal justice system, Marian’s approach to harm reduction advocates a fundamental need to challenge ‘victim-blaming’ in society while seeking accountability from those who impart or condone such harm. ► Find out more about Dr Marian Duggan: https://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/staff/academic/c-d/duggan-marian.html?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=DugganProfile&utm_campaign=ThinkKent1516 Find the University of Kent on social media: ► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UniversityofKent ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/unikent ► Instagram: https://instagram.com/unikentlive/ ► LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/university-of-kent
Views: 6888 University of Kent
Flexible working: The way of the future? | Dr Heejung Chung | Think Kent
 
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THINK KENT – INTERNATIONAL THINKERS | GLOBAL IMPACT The way we work has changed considerably in recent years with an increasing number of people gaining access to flexible working and more control over their work schedules. But in reality, has such flexibility given employees more freedom and autonomy? Dr Heejung Chung from the University of Kent explores the benefits of flexible working and the potential negative effects it can have for workers, especially in the context of increased competition, high unemployment and the decline of worker and union power. ► SEARCH for a course at the University of Kent: http://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=ChungSearch&utm_campaign=ThinkKent1516 ► Research at Kent: https://www.kent.ac.uk/research/?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=ChungResearch&utm_campaign=ThinkKent1516 ► SUBSCRIBE for more Think Kent lectures: http://www.youtube.com/user/UniversityofKent?sub_confirmation=1 ABOUT DR HEEJUNG CHUNG Dr Chung’s research interests are broadly around issues concerning cross-national comparative analysis of welfare states and their labour markets. One key question she is currently tackling is how working time flexibility impacts individual's work-life balance, and the role of contexts in moderating that influence. She is also exploring how welfare state institutions and socio-economic factors shape individual's perceived employment insecurity. Dr Chung’s key research interests include: European welfare states and labour markets; Subjective employment insecurity; Working time flexibility and job autonomy, Work-life balance and work-family conflict, Gender equality and gender norms, Cross-national data and European data, Multi-level modelling and other advance quantitative methods, Policy and document analysis. ► Find out more about Dr Chung: https://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/staff/academic/c-d/chung-heejung.html?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=ChungProfile&utm_campaign=ThinkKent1516 Find the University of Kent on social media: ► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UniversityofKent ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/unikent ► Instagram: https://instagram.com/unikentlive/ ► LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/university-of-kent
Views: 26094 University of Kent
Go Abroad | Virginia Tech, USA | Lasian Stephenson | University of Kent
 
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Hear what University of Kent American Studies student Lasian Stephenson enjoyed about her year abroad at Virgina Tech, USA. Discover where you could go at http://www.kent.ac.uk/goabroad
Views: 983 University of Kent
Professor Keith Hayward - Professor of Criminology
 
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Find out more about Professor Hayward's research interests - http://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/staff/academic/hayward.html Go to the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research - http://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/index.html
Views: 4137 University of Kent
Is Ageing Inevitable? Understanding the Biology of Ageing | Open Lecture | University of Kent
 
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http://www.kent.ac.uk Can Science extend lifespan and improve the quality of late-life health? Dr Jennifer Tullet, Biosciences lecturer and researcher at the University of Kent, discusses current research into the ageing process.
Views: 8153 University of Kent
Sexual Offending: Measuring and understanding paedophilic sexual interest | Dr Caoilte Ó Ciardha
 
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THINK KENT – INTERNATIONAL THINKERS | GLOBAL IMPACT Sexual offending is a topic that many people simply don’t want to think about. Perhaps due to this, many people hold myths about sexual offending. Unfortunately, the sexual abuse of children is so prevalent that it demands the attention of scientists so that prevention and intervention is based on what works rather than myth. One common myth about sexual offending is that child molesters are always paedophiles. In fact these terms are not interchangeable with many child molesters not showing evidence of a sexual interest in children beyond their offences. However, having paedophilic interest is, as you might expect, related to a higher risk of offending. As a result being able to measure paedophilia is extremely important. In this video Dr Caoilte Ó Ciardha examines different approaches that can measure age appropriate-sexual interests in male participants. He then discusses the potential of these approaches in the measurement and understanding of paedophilic sexual interest.  ► SEARCH for a course at the University of Kent: http://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=CiardhaSearch&utm_campaign=ThinkKent1516 ► Research at Kent: https://www.kent.ac.uk/research/?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=CiardhaResearch&utm_campaign=ThinkKent1516 ► SUBSCRIBE for more Think Kent lectures: http://www.youtube.com/user/UniversityofKent?sub_confirmation=1 ABOUT DR CAOILTE Ó CIARDHA Dr Ó Ciardha is interested in the role of cognition in offending behaviour. In other words, he is interested in seeing how people's thought processes may lead them to offend, or protect them from offending. Furthermore, he is interested in researching how treating those processes may reduce re-offending. To date Dr Ó Ciardha’s research has focused on cognition with regard to child molestation, sexual violence towards adults, and firesetting. ► Find out more about Dr Caoilte Ó Ciardha: https://www.kent.ac.uk/psychology/people/ociardhac/?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=CiardhaProfile&utm_campaign=ThinkKent1516 Find the University of Kent on social media: ► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UniversityofKent ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/unikent ► Instagram: https://instagram.com/unikentlive/ ► LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/university-of-kent
Views: 7568 University of Kent
Supramolecular Chemistry and Drug Discovery | Dr Jennifer Hiscock | Think Kent
 
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► SEARCH for a course at the University of Kent: http://bit.ly/2CUKLkF ► Research at Kent: http://bit.ly/2jbvZgS ► SUBSCRIBE for more Think Kent lectures: http://www.youtube.com/user/UniversityofKent?sub_confirmation=1 THINK KENT – INTERNATIONAL THINKERS | GLOBAL IMPACT In this lecture, Dr Jennifer Hiscock, Chemistry Research Fellow at the University of Kent, discusses a new class of hydrogen bond donating, anionic monomers, and discusses their hydrogen bonded self-association at the molecular, macroscopic and global levels through the use of ‘every technique that she can get her hands on and convince her students to use’. Through the understanding and therefore control of hydrogen-bonded self-associating systems Jennifer and her fantastic team of PhDs, Mres and undergraduate students are making considerable headway in solving real world problems. ABOUT DR JENNIFER HISCOCK Dr Hiscock moved to the University of Kent to start her independent academic career in 2015, joining the School of Physical Sciences as the Caldin Research Fellow. In 2016 she was appointed lecturer within the School of Physical Sciences and in 2017 she took on her first three PhD students specializing in supramolecular self-association and the development of novel antimicrobials. Her enthusiasm for science comes from taking discoveries out of the lab and into the real world.   Jennifer completed her Biological and Medicinal Chemistry BSc at the University of Exeter before moving to the University of Southampton where she obtained her PhD under the supervision of Professor Philip Gale, continuing at the same institution for a further six years in various post-doctoral roles. During this time she developed her love for the study of non-covalent interactions through the development of molecular sensors, organocatalysts and hydrogen bonded materials. ► Find out more about Dr Jennifer Hiscock: http://bit.ly/2oAUo4K Find the University of Kent on social media: ► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UniversityofKent ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/unikent ► Instagram: https://instagram.com/unikentlive/ ► LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/university-of-kent
Views: 3315 University of Kent
Gavin Esler In Conversation with Brenda Blethyn
 
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We hosted In Conversation with Brenda Blethyn OBE at the University of Kent on Monday 30 January 2017. For more information about the series and to find out who's up next in the series, please visit www.kent.ac.uk/events Proceeds from ticket sales went to the Kent Opportunity Fund, supporting our students: https://www.kent.ac.uk/giving/opportunityfund/
Views: 10892 University of Kent
The Transnational Politics of Empathy | Dr Carolyn Pedwell | Think Kent
 
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THINK KENT – INTERNATIONAL THINKERS | GLOBAL IMPACT Creating more or better empathy is now framed as an affective ‘solution’ to a wide range of social ills and as a central component of building cross-cultural and transnational social justice. Yet empathy - understood in shorthand as the affective ability to ‘put oneself in the other’s shoes’ - can easily become a kind of end-point. Precisely because it is so widely and unquestioningly viewed as ‘good,’ its naming can represent a conceptual stoppage in conversation or analysis. Thus, the most pressing questions tend less to be ‘what is empathy?’, ‘what does it do?’, ‘what are its risks?’, and ‘what happens after empathy’, but rather the more automatic refrain of ‘how can we cultivate it?’ It is also evident that, although a number of commentators in the global North insist that empathy can play an important role in mediating relations between different social and cultural groups and across national and geo-political boundaries, relatively scant attention has been paid specifically to the transnational politics of empathy. As such, we have little insight into how empathy emerges and flows through global circuits of power, and the complex ways in which it transforms and translates as it travels between diverse contexts. In the face of these dynamics, my work has grappled with two central questions: firstly, how can we think more critically about the contemporary political workings of empathy? and secondly, how might we understand the complex links between empathy and transnational relations of power?  ► SEARCH for a course at the University of Kent: http://bit.ly/1LWnkJX ► Research at Kent: http://bit.ly/1TzHbRS ► SUBSCRIBE for more Think Kent lectures: http://www.youtube.com/user/UniversityofKent?sub_confirmation=1 ABOUT DR CAROLYN PEDWELL Dr. Carolyn Pedwell is Senior Lecturer in Cultural Studies in the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research at the University of Kent and has recently been Visiting Scholar at University of Sydney, Queen Mary and the London School of Economics.  She is author of ‘Affective Relations: The Transnational Politics of Empathy’ (Palgrave, 2014) and ‘Feminism, Culture and Embodied Practice: The Rhetorics of Comparison’ (Routledge: 2010).  Carolyn is also an Editor of the international journal ‘Feminist Theory’.   ► Find out more about Dr Carolyn Pedwell: http://bit.ly/1YFEuh6 Find the University of Kent on social media: ► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UniversityofKent ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/unikent ► Instagram: https://instagram.com/unikentlive/ ► LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/university-of-kent
Views: 3137 University of Kent
Reflections on the European Court of Justice's judgment in Van Gend en Loos | Professor Nick Grief
 
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► SEARCH for a course at the University of Kent: http://bit.ly/2eC3kBx ► FIND OUT MORE about Kent Law School: http://bit.ly/2gjHL80 ► Research at Kent: http://bit.ly/2fCnwQP ► SUBSCRIBE for more Think Kent lectures: http://www.youtube.com/user/UniversityofKent?sub_confirmation=1 THINK KENT – INTERNATIONAL THINKERS | GLOBAL IMPACT This lecture concerns the European Court of Justice’s seminal judgment in Van Gend en Loos in which the Court articulated the doctrine of direct effect, according to which EU law can create rights for individuals which national courts must protect. Over 50 years on, the judgment continues to provoke strong reactions, dividing those who welcome it as a legitimate exercise of teleological interpretation from those who denounce it as a classic example of judicial activism – of the ECJ ‘trespassing outside its province’ as Professor Hampson once put it.   As his contribution to the debate, Professor Grief suggests that VGL was a logical and even foreseeable development rooted in the Treaty and in international law. By empowering individuals, the judgment ensured closer scrutiny of the Member States’ actions and more effective enforcement of the obligations they had undertaken, thus helping to ensure that the Treaty’s objectives and its framers’ intentions would be achieved. ABOUT PROFESSOR NICK GRIEF Nick Grief specialises in international law and EU law. Educated at Kent (BA, PhD), he taught at Exeter and Bournemouth before returning to Kent in 2010. Besides being a professor in Kent Law School, he practises at the Bar from Doughty Street Chambers. For many years he delivered EU law training for the Government Legal Service and the Financial Conduct Authority, and continues to do so for the Legal Service Directorate of the National Assembly for Wales. Notable cases in which he has appeared as counsel include R v Jones and others (on whether the crime of aggression was capable of being a crime in English law) and A and others v Secretary of State for the Home Department (on the admissibility of evidence procured by torture of a third party by foreign agents). He has given evidence to English courts and the House of Commons Defence Committee on the legality of nuclear weapons and recently represented the Marshall Islands in the International Court of Justice in cases concerning the obligation to pursue and conclude negotiations on nuclear disarmament. He has also been instructed as an expert witness on EU law and produced a European law module for new judges as part of the Judicial College Orientation Programme. ► Find out more about Professor Nick Grief: http://bit.ly/2f1209P Find the University of Kent on social media: ► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UniversityofKent ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/unikent ► Instagram: https://instagram.com/unikentlive/ ► LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/university-of-kent
Views: 4581 University of Kent
What is Humanities Research?
 
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A short film, narrated by Gavin Esler – Chancellor of the University of Kent, sets out to answer this question as part of the University's 50th anniversary celebrations. The animation, in just 3 ½ minutes, encapsulates the current issues and debates for Humanities researchers: time for research, metrics and measuring outcomes, the role of research grants, practice as research, internationalisation, public engagement and, of course, the REF. Professor Ray Laurence and Dr Tamar Jeffers-McDonald led the project to make this film. Kent researchers, from those at the start of their careers to senior professors discussed the nature of research in Humanities and the issues that preoccupied them. The film was made by Cognitive – a Folkestone based Animation Studio, who have produced animations for the BBC Radio 4: A History of Ideas series. The Faculty of Humanities at Kent has 224 research active academics located in six schools: Architecture, Arts, English, European Culture and Languages, History, and Music & Fine Art. Ray Laurence was Director of Research and Enterprise in the Faculty of Humanities at Kent from 2013 to 2015 and is Professor of Roman History and Archaeology at the University. He has previously made three films with Cognitive including: ‘A Glimpse of Teenage Life in Ancient Rome’, which has more than a million views on YouTube. Tamar Jeffers-McDonald was Director of Graduate Studies in the Faculty of Humanities at Kent from 2013 to 2015 and is Reader in Film Studies. Her most recent book When Harry met Sally is published in November. The film will allow future generations of academics to get a glimpse of what preoccupied us in 2015.
Views: 5184 University of Kent
The Body | Dr Chris Shilling | Think Kent
 
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THINK KENT – INTERNATIONAL THINKERS | GLOBAL IMPACT The body is an amazing mechanism that enables us to exist, move and function throughout our daily lives, but we often overlook its importance for our social identities and for the maintenance and development of societies. In this talk, Dr Chris Shilling from the University of Kent highlights how 'body matters' are key to contemporary social trends and problems, explores the potential of classical sociology to aid our understanding of embodiment, and identifies some of the multiple reasons why the body has become a source of conflict in the contemporary era. ► SEARCH for a course at the University of Kent: http://bit.ly/1nJ2ySS ► Research at Kent: http://bit.ly/1RJzXF9 ► SUBSCRIBE for more Think Kent lectures: http://www.youtube.com/user/UniversityofKent?sub_confirmation=1 ► FIND ‘The Body’ by Dr Chris Shilling: http://amzn.to/1QS2XN6 ABOUT DR CHRIS SHILLING Dr Chris Shilling is a Professor of Sociology and Director of Graduate Studies (Research) in SSPSSR at the University of Kent, and a Visiting Professor at the University of Uppsala. He teaches modules on 'Cultures of Embodiment', 'Sociology of Religion' and 'Foundations of Sociology', and his monographs include ‘The Body and Social Theory’ (3rd edition 2012), ‘Changing Bodies’ (2008), ‘The Body in Culture’, ‘Technology and Society’ (2005), and (with Philip A. Mellor) ‘Sociology of the Sacred’ (2014), ‘The Sociological Ambition’ (2001), and ‘Reforming the Body. Religion, Community and Modernity’ (1997). His latest book is ‘The Body. A Very Short Introduction’ published in January 2016 with Oxford University Press (https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-body-a-very-short-introduction-9780198739036?cc=gb&lang=en&). ► Find out more about Dr Chris Shilling: http://bit.ly/1LmuQOo Find the University of Kent on social media: ► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UniversityofKent ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/unikent ► Instagram: https://instagram.com/unikentlive/ ► LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/university-of-kent
Views: 5316 University of Kent
Guide to Arrivals Weekend at Medway
 
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Quick guide to the things you must do when you arrive on the Medway campus. Find out more at: www.kent.ac.uk/gettingstarted
Views: 3486 University of Kent
Tyler Court - the one on the hill
 
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Find out about Tyler Court our en-suite accommodation on the hill.
Views: 5223 University of Kent
Life as a Sociolinguist | Dr David Hornsby | Think Kent
 
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► SEARCH for a course at the University of Kent: http://bit.ly/2fvvZWM ► Research at Kent: http://bit.ly/2eF4Xg6 ► SUBSCRIBE for more Think Kent lectures: http://www.youtube.com/user/UniversityofKent?sub_confirmation=1 THINK KENT – INTERNATIONAL THINKERS | GLOBAL IMPACT Most English speakers are aware of differences in speech varieties, be they geographical (Geordie vs. Cockney), social (‘posh’ v ‘working-class’ accents), or stylistic (all of us modify our speech according to our circumstances and audience). So it was surprising that sociolinguistics, which explores the relationship between language and society, was not considered an important area of study until the 1960s. In this lecture, David Hornsby explores some early sociolinguistic findings, and then considers the more complex questions that sociolinguists are currently asking. Do different kinds of linguistic change happen in different types of community, for example, and what happens when migration brings speakers of different dialects together? In some cases, new mixed dialects or ‘koinés’ can develop. A rare example of a koiné can be heard in the east Kent coalfield, and is the subject of David’s current research. ABOUT DR DAVID HORNSBY David has been interested in language variation since early childhood, but only discovered that a subject called ‘variationist sociolinguistics’ existed when he went to university. He has worked on variation and change in French and English, and teaches a range of modules focused on spoken language variation in both languages. He also teaches modules on the history of English and the history of French, both of which consider change from a sociolinguistic perspective. Since his area of study is spoken language, he has been spuriously claiming to be ‘working’ whenever he’s chatting to others, or even eavesdropping on pub conversations, since taking up his post at Kent in 1990. ► Find out more about Dr David Hornsby: http://bit.ly/2evAwWC Find the University of Kent on social media: ► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UniversityofKent ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/unikent ► Instagram: https://instagram.com/unikentlive/ ► LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/university-of-kent
Views: 4278 University of Kent
Gavin Esler In Conversation with Dame Diana Rigg
 
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On 28 November 2016, Gavin Esler, Chancellor of the University of Kent welcome Dame Diana Rigg DBE to the University as part of the second series of In Conversation. For more information about future events, please visit www.kent.ac.uk/events
Views: 21022 University of Kent
The feminine leader | Dr Patricia Lewis | Think Kent
 
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THINK KENT – INTERNATIONAL THINKERS | GLOBAL IMPACT The emergence of the business figure the “Feminine Leader” in the 1990s would appear to suggest that women’s inclusion in senior positions in contemporary organizations is no longer problematic.  Why then is there still a “shortage” of women in senior leadership positions? The default response to such a question is to suggest that women “choose” not to take-up leadership roles, usually because of the demands of family or alternatively they don’t have the “confidence” to put themselves forward.  These conventional responses are notable for the emphasis they put on the actions (or non-actions) of individual women. In contrast, in this lecture, Dr Patricia Lewis from the University of Kent, draws on the concept of postfeminism to explore the cultural norms which impact on the take-up and enactment of contemporary feminine leadership addressing two questions: first, what prompted the validation of feminine difference such that femininity is now perceived to be a source of advantage for women and crucial for successful leadership in the 21st century?  Second, why haven’t women gained more advantage from the materialization of the feminine leader? ► SEARCH for a course at the University of Kent: http://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=LewisSearch&utm_campaign=ThinkKent1516 ► Research at Kent: https://www.kent.ac.uk/research/?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=LewisResearch&utm_campaign=ThinkKent1516 ► SUBSCRIBE for more Think Kent lectures: http://www.youtube.com/user/UniversityofKent?sub_confirmation=1 ABOUT DR PATRICIA LEWIS Patricia Lewis' research is located in the broad area of Gender and Organisation Studies and she is interested in exploring the impact of social and cultural norms (connected to gender) on managers, management and organisations. She draws on a range of concepts derived from a poststructuralist feminist position with attention directed at issues of gendered discourses, gendered identity and gendered identity work. Her empirical work is largely located in the area of entrepreneurship studies with a main focus on female entrepreneurs. Within this context she has explored issues such as the masculine norm attached to entrepreneurship and its impact on women's access to the entrepreneurial field; the identity work of female entrepreneurs; the emergence of the 'mumpreneur' as a new entrepreneurial persona. She is currently exploring the notion of postfeminism, working from a position which understands this cultural phenomena as a discursive formation which is shaping and fashioning contemporary feminine identity. In seeking to demonstrate how the concept of postfeminism can be used critically in the gender and organisation studies field she is developing the notion of entrepreneurial femininities and argues for the need to build in-depth understanding of the (gendered) nature of women's inclusion in organisations in general and entrepreneurship in particular. She has published her work in a range of journals including Organization Studies, Human Relations, Gender, Work and Organization, International Journal of Management Reviews, British Journal of Management and Journal of Business Ethics. Patricia is currently a co-researcher with colleagues from Cranfield University, University of Essex and Middlesex University on an ESRC funded seminar series entitled Exploring Gendered Inclusion in Contemporary Organisations. ► Find out more about Dr Patricia Lewis: https://www.kent.ac.uk/kbs/our-staff/profiles/lewis_patricia.html?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=LewisProfile&utm_campaign=ThinkKent1516 Find the University of Kent on social media: ► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UniversityofKent ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/unikent ► Instagram: https://instagram.com/unikentlive/ ► LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/university-of-kent
Views: 3589 University of Kent
Introducing Professor Karen Cox to our alumni community
 
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Professor Karen Cox is the new Vice-Chancellor and President of the University of Kent. She started in the role at the beginning of August 2017, and wanted to share this message with our global alumni community.
Views: 855 University of Kent
Why study a postgraduate taught degree? | University of Kent
 
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Informed by world-leading research, Kent's postgraduate taught courses are designed to give you a competitive edge internationally. Find out more at http://bit.ly/2zNO1wG
Views: 989 University of Kent