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Democracy - A short introduction
 
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Learn more about the origins of Democracy at the Great Courses Plus: http://bit.ly/Learn-About-Democracy This is a 3 minute video to introduce the most basic concepts of a Democracy. Democracy is a form of government in which all eligible citizens participate equally—either directly or indirectly through elected representatives—in the proposal, development, and creation of laws. It encompasses social, religious, cultural, ethnic and racial equality, justice, liberty and fraternity. To download the video, go here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B80QLbZggGszblRxZ3hLMU5kZWc/edit?usp=sharing More Info: - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Democracy If you know of more links with good infos please let us know in the comments and we'll add them here. Collaboration: - Storyboard: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B80QLbZggGszcEE2N19EcjRlLVk&usp=sharing Please help us make this video better by collaborating on the scrip and storyboard. We're really looking forward to your comments :) === Video Script: Scene 1 The word democracy comes from the Greek words of “démos” which means “people” and “krátos” which means “power” or “rule”, So democracy basically means “the rule of the people.” Scene 2 Democracy first started as a direct democracy, in Greek cities, notably Ancient Athens, where people came together to speak about their concerns and opinions, in front of rulers of the city state, and directly voted on new rules and laws. Here is considered as the birthplace of democracy . Scene 3 So, For the very first time, decisions were made by the people instead of rulers... but sadly, the ancient greeks did not see all people equally. Slaves, women, children and the people who did not have a land weren’t allowed to vote. This is what we call a “flawed” democracy today. Scene 4 After the Greeks lost their power and influence in the first century AD, their early forms of democracy were also fading away until the Magna Carta was signed in 1215, which prevented the King of England to do whatever he wanted and said that even the King had to follow the country’s rules and laws which were written in the constitution. Scene 5 Today, most democracies are indirect or representative which means that you can’t vote for a new law yourself, but you can vote for people who then become law makers and present your interests. But democracy isn’t just about voting; it’s about everything to protect the best interests of the people, no matter what is their race, gender, political opinion, or religion. These interests can be human rights, quality of life, infrastructure and many more. Scene 6 Modern democracies divide powers into three different branches : the legislative (the people who make law), the executive (the people who make sure that you obey the law), and the judiciary (who judge you if you commit a crime). These three are independent and work following the process « checks and balances » which means all the work must be clear and fair. And, very important, the people who have power also must follow the law and not exceed their authority. Scene 7 In addition, a democratic government must work in a way that reflects the wish /feeling/desire and values of the society that it governs—this is also known as the « General Will », which is a concept developed by the famous Swiss philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Scene 8 One of the problems of democratic voting is that the biggest groups of people always have the most power and that’s why a good democracy also has laws to protect the rights of its smaller and weaker groups. A democracy where the majority chooses to separate, set apart, expel or injure its minority is not a functioning democracy! Scene 9 So, with those mentioned above, what do you think now about democracy? Winston Churchill once said: “Democracy is the worst form of government, except for all those other forms that have been tried from time to time.” Do you agree? === with love your MinuteVideos team https://minutevideos.com/
Views: 497727 MinuteVideos
Democracy, Authoritarian Capitalism, and China: Crash Course World History 230
 
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In which John Green teaches you about the end of World History, and the end of the world as we know it, kind of. For the last hundred years or so, it seemed that one important ingredient for running an economically successful country was a western-style democratic government. All evidence pointed to the idea that capitalist representative democracies made for the best economic outcomes. It turns out that isn't the only way to succeed. In the last 40 years or so, authoritarian capitalism as it's practiced in places like China and Singapore has been working really, really well. John is going to look at these systems and talk about why they work, and he's even going to make a few predictions about the future. Also, thanks for watching this series. It has been amazingly fun to create, and we appreciate all of you. Citation 1: John Micklethwait & Adrian Woolridge. The Fourth Revolution: The Global Race to Reinvent the State. Penguin, New York 2014 p. 68 Citation 2: Han Fook Kwang, ed., Lee Kuan Yew: The Man and His Ideas. Times Edition: 1997 p194 Citation 3: Quoted in Micklethwait & Woolridge, p155 Citation 4: Micklethwait & Woolridge, p159 Crash Course is now on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse TO: Noura M. AlMohaimeed FROM: Bodour K. AlGhamdi Happy Birthday to my easily excitable friend and companion, Noura. TO: Hank & John Green FROM: Owain Blackwood MESSAGE: Thanks a billion for helping me get into medical school! Thank you so much to all of our awesome supporters for their contributions to help make Crash Course possible and freely available for everyone forever: Sam Caldwell Sam Caldwell, again www.justplainsomething.com Leanne Gover Moti Lieberman Julie Anne Mathieu Jessica Baker Teodora Miclaus Christopher Keelty Anthony "Fishbot Engineer" M. Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1220048 CrashCourse
POLITICAL THEORY - John Locke
 
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John Locke's greatness as a philosopher is based on his theories on childhood, his work on religious toleration and his concept of the rights of citizens. He helped to make us who we are. If you like our films take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): http://www.theschooloflife.com/shop/all/ Brought to you by http://www.theschooloflife.com Produced in collaboration with Reflective films http://www.reflectivefilms.co.uk #TheSchoolOfLife
Views: 903125 The School of Life
Democratic Principles of Government
 
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#touchcast Created with TouchCast https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/touchcast/id603258418 For the interactive version visit: http://touchcast.com/mrmcclary/democratic_principles_of_government
Views: 109 Jeremy McClary
Democratic ideals of US government
 
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Ideas of natural rights, social contract, popular sovereignty, limited government and republicanism and their influence on the foundation of the United States of America.
Views: 28207 Khan Academy
Once upon a time, local democracy
 
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This video was produced by the Council of Europe's Centre of Expertise for Local Government Reform as part of its programme to strengthen local and regional government capacity in Ukraine, and was funded by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency - Sida. Its aim is to raise awareness of the importance of strong local government for enhancing the quality of local life. As the level of government closest to local communities, local government is often better placed for responding to local needs. They have a better knowledge of the local environment, the local people, their culture and traditions, as well as of any special geographical advantages or difficulties to be accounted for. Public services and administration organised at this level are often better adapted to the local context. The Centre of Expertise for Local Government is a body of the Council of Europe which supports member States in the delivery of good democratic local government. It was set up following a decision of the Heads of State and Government of the Council of Europe when they met for a third summit in Warsaw in May 2005. Through this initiative, Council of Europe member States recognise the on-going importance of decentralisation and the essential role of effective local authorities in a sound democracy. The Centre responds to the challenge of building up the capacities of local authorities -- and their Associations -- to be able to provide good leadership and deliver local services to European standards. For further information, visit our website: www.coe.int/local, or follow us on twitter @coe_cdlr.
Views: 66075 Council of Europe
Types of Democracy
 
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Democracy Types:Direct Democracy
Views: 27410 Learn Online
Normative Theories of Democracy
 
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This video lecture discusses three normative theories of democracy -- direct democracy, liberal democracy, and deliberative democracy -- that can inform our understanding of contemporary US government and politics, as well as the roles and functions of political communication in our system. The content is derived in part from Richard Perloff's (2014) The Dynamics of Political Communication, chapter 1.
Views: 3161 Stephen Klien
Political Ideology: Crash Course Government and Politics #35
 
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So today Craig is going to look at political ideology in America. We're going to focus on liberals and conservatives and talk about the influencers of both of these viewpoints. Now, it's important to remember that political ideologies don't always perfectly correspond with political parties, and this correspondence becomes less and less likely over time. So, sure we can say that Democrats tend to be liberal and Republicans tend to be conservative, but we're not going to be talking about political parties in this episode. It's also important to note, that there are going to be a lot of generalizations here, as most peoples' ideologies fall on a spectrum, but we're going to try our best *crosses fingers* to summarize the most commonly held viewpoints for each of these positions as they are used pretty frequently in discussions of American politics. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1141297 CrashCourse
How is power divided in the United States government? - Belinda Stutzman
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-is-power-divided-in-the-united-states-government-belinda-stutzman Article II of the United States Constitution allows for three separate branches of government (legislative, executive, and judicial), along with a system of checks and balances should any branch get too powerful. Belinda Stutzman breaks down each branch and its constitutionally-entitled powers. Lesson by Belinda Stutzman, animation by Johnny Chew.
Views: 1133876 TED-Ed
What is Democracy?
 
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An awesome video with my thoughts about Democracy and what it means to me.
Views: 370787 Dan Zimmerman
Direct Democracy: 7 Essential Principles for Ressurrecting Western Democracy MOV01674.MPG
 
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Democracy in the western world is now a hollow shell. We have never moved past mere representative democracy to embrace the Swiss system of direct democracy. Unless we do the 7 key principles for full democracy will be lost.
Views: 592 chrissalt100
AP Government: Part I Theories on Democracy
 
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This PowerPoint, with activities, and lesson plans are available @ https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Mr-Raymond-Civics-And-Social-Studies-Academy This is Part I of our series for A.P. Government. I’ve used the two major textbooks to cover chapter 1 of James Wilson’s American Government, and Government in America by Edwards, Wattenberg, and Lineberry. Included in the lesson is: What is government? Public policy How does government impact us? What is politics? Three branches of government Political power Authority Political legitimacy Debates over political power introduction Athenian democracy Direct-democracy Democracy Aristotle “rule of the many” Republic – Representative democracy Why is America a republic? Framers / Founding Fathers view of democracy Expansion of democracy Traditional / participatory democracy Robert Dahl’s Key Principles for Democracy Majority rule vs. minority rights Three contemporary theories of democracy: Pluralism Elite democracy Plutocracy Citizens United (intro) Hyperpluralism Madison’s Federalist Essay #10 Voter apathy Like most of the videos on Mr. Raymond’s Social Studies Academy’s lessons, this video ends with a review “quiz.” Remember that the PowerPoint in this video as well as a variety of lesson plans, worksheets, smartboard files, and activities, are available at Teachers Pay Teachers. As a social studies teacher, I have often looked for good YouTube video clips to show my students. I hope these videos will serve as a supplement to lessons for social studies teachers, US history teachers, and their students. This series is also made for students taking any U.S Government class. All content in this video is for educational purposes only… ***For noncommercial, educational, and archival purposes under Law of Fair Use as provided in section 107 of the US copyright law. No copyrights infringements intended*** LO A.1.A: Compare how models of representative democracy are visible in major institutions, policies, events, or debates in the U.S. EK 1.A.1.b: Representative democracies can take several forms along this scale: • Participatory democracy, which emphasizes broad participation in politics and civil society • Pluralist democracy, which recognizes group-based activism by non-governmental interests striving for impact on political decision making • Elite democracy, where decisions are made by elected representatives acting as trustees EK 1.A.1.d: The three models of representative democracy continue to be reflected in contemporary institutions and political behavior
Democracy  Definition for Kids
 
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8th grade definition of Democracy
Views: 60318 History Illustrated
What Is A Democratic Government?
 
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democracy definition. A system of government in which power is vested in the people, who rule either directly or through freely elected representatives. Note: Democratic institutions, such as parliaments, may exist in a monarchy. Democracy is sometimes referred to as 'rule of the majority' define democratic government. What makes a successful democratic government? . History, development, systems, theory, & challenges a short definition of democracy buildingwhat is democracy? Definition, types history live science. What is democracy? Definition, types & principles video democratic. Often people think that democracy is a direct rule of the la ancient athens, and republic indirect such as in united states, fact both terms are could government by people; A form which supreme power vested exercised directly them or their elected agents under free electoral systema state having states canada democracies (greek d mokrata, literally 'rule people'), modern usage, system citizens exercise elect representatives from among themselves to governing body, parliament. Political participation requires that all the people kids learn about democracy and characteristics of this type government including direct indirect democracy, how it works within united states government, realities today, fun facts word describes a political system. Definition from the government topic democracy democratic form of is an us for kids duckstersour country, our parliamentdemocracy. The so called 'democracies' in classical antiquity (athens and rome) represent precursors of modern democracies democracy the essential thing as distinguished from this or that democratic government was primarily an attitude mind, a spiritual testament, not economic structure political machine. The term democracy comes from the greek language and means 'rule by (simple) people'. This is called a democracy system of government that bases its legitimacy on the participation people. What is democracy? Stanford university. You all agree that everyone should have a share in managing the club, making decisions, and regulating finances so you democratic government topic by longman dictionary of contemporary english what need to know about words, phrases expressions. You and a few of your friends have decided to start fan club for favorite band. Googleusercontent search. The founders preferred the term 'republic' to 'democracy'. Define democracy at dictionary browse url? Q webcache. Canadian citizens normally elect someone to represent them in making decisions at the different levels of government. In this system, representatives are chosen by the people to make decisions for them. You want to develop some kind of government keep the club organized and running smoothly. The term federal refers to the fact that we are in truth, a union of states with government. Democratic government synonyms, democratic pronunciation, translation, english dictionary definition of governmentgovernment by the people, exercised eith
Democratic Principles for an Open Internet
 
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The Democratic Principles for an Open Internet have been primarily designed for citizens and civil society organizations in fragile and emerging democracies, who are new to the digital rights space, are beginning to engage more regularly online, and who may be more likely to encounter deliberate internet disruptions as a result of government interference. These principles are a grassroots effort to adapt the Internet Rights & Principles Coalition's 10 Internet Rights and Principles from a democratic lens to empower and improve the digital rights literacy of activists and civil society organizations in the Global South. We hope this guide will help activists working for democracy in an internet age and connect them in global peer networks to exchange best practices. The guide also serves as an advocacy tool that organizations can utilize in pushing governments, the private sector, and civil society to adhere to universal human rights through open internet principles and standards.
POLITICAL THEORY - John Rawls
 
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How do you get a society that provides basic decent services to all citizens? Political theorist John Rawls had a good idea, and it was called 'the veil of ignorance.' SUBSCRIBE to our channel for new films every week: http://tinyurl.com/o28mut7 If you like our films take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): http://www.theschooloflife.com/shop/all/ Brought to you by http://www.theschooloflife.com Produced in collaboration with Mike Booth http://www.YouTube.com/SomeGreyBloke #TheSchoolOfLife
Views: 750030 The School of Life
The New Democracy Party
 
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The New Democracy Party: An Australian Alternative - Our journey and strategy (Panel 18) (PRESENTER: Vernon Kringas) Vernon Kringas from The Australian New Democracy Party will discuss the party's agenda and encourages feedback during this interactive workshop. There is a genuine opening in the Australian political system for several reasons, including policies that leverage the true spending capacity of government plus growing inequality and political frustration, We are trying to crack one of the greatest communication challenges of our time (no government budget constraint). Our principles articulate rights of all Australians, which a majority of people seem to find self-evident - we believe our representatives in our common wealth government are responsible for effecting these rights. Our policy positions include: Job guarantee; Free health, dental and education; Investing in transitions: sustainability; public infrastructure; accessible and affordable housing; and R & D; No government debt issuance; Central bank support rate to equal the target interbank lending rate; Public banks; Banning speculation not related to trade in real goods and services; Withdrawing support for IMF; Progressive social and public governance policies. Key elements of our strategy include: Collaborative and consultative leadership and decision making; Democratic process for developing policy; Welcoming anyone who agrees with our principles and respects our democratic processes – four archetypes; Grassroots action empowered by active local branches built upon scaffolds of clicks and links infrastructure to provide local relevance and feedback on policies from local communities to regions, states up to national; Social campaigns leading to community campaigns.
Views: 88 MMT Conference
What Is Communism?
 
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The Huge Problem With For-Profit Prisons http://testu.be/1UKhQ6r » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe Critics argue that bail conditions favor the rich over the poor. So how does bail actually work, and is it an unfair system? Learn More: APNewsBreak: NYC to offer non-bail option for some suspects http://bigstory.ap.org/article/13db62fb0947428499cf007a16c3cc06/apnewsbreak-nyc-eliminate-bail-non-violent-suspects "Thousands of New Yorkers accused of low-level or non-violent crimes won't face the prospect of raising cash for bail under a plan that seeks to keep such suspects out of the troubled Rikers Island jail complex." Kalief Browder, 1993-2015 http://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/kalief-browder-1993-2015 "Last fall, I wrote about a young man named Kalief Browder, who spent three years on Rikers Island without being convicted of a crime. " America's bail system: one law for the rich, another for poor http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/feb/14/america-bail-system-law-rich-poor "If you've ever been arrested for a misdemeanor offense, like jumping a turnstile, smoking a joint, or protesting a cause in a way the authorities would rather you didn't, then you'll know that your best chance of avoiding jail has less to do with what you've done than if you can make bail." In Misdemeanor Cases, Long Waits for Elusive Trials http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/01/nyregion/justice-denied-for-misdemeanor-cases-trials-are-elusive.html?pagewanted=all "Francisco Zapata keeps a copy of the Constitution on his cellphone. So when the police stopped, frisked and charged him with misdemeanor marijuana possession, he wanted what that cellphone document promised." _________________________ NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. More from NowThis: » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like NowThis World on Facebook: https://go.nowth.is/World_Facebook » Connect with Judah: Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter – Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah » Connect with Versha: Follow @versharma on Twitter – Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld
Views: 1936650 NowThis World
What Is A Democratic Government?
 
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A short definition of democracy building. Democracies are free only if the people know what freedom is and defining democracy. What is a democratic government? are some examples? Quorademocratic government definition of by democracy what How does it differ from other governments boundless. We can think of democracy as a system government with four key elements political is by far the most challenging form both for politicians and people. What makes a successful democratic government? . Democracy is a form of government in which all eligible citizens have an equal say so course democracy that gives power to the people. You and a few of your friends have decided to start fan club for favorite band. What is democracy? Definition, types & history live science. Cleisthenes is referred to as 'the father of democratic government synonyms, pronunciation, haunted by visions what will be' [alexis de tocqueville democracy in america]. What is indirect democracy? Definition, advantages 28 jun 2017 find out how that's different from what we do in the us and if it's really such a required all citizens to vote on major issues of government. The term democracy comes from the greek language and what is a democracy? A government run by people. What is a democracy? [ushistory]. Of the people, based on their perceptions of what people want and need 21 jan 2004 i to begin with an overview democracy is. What is a democratic government? are some examples? Quora let me first write down the definition of government that governed by people democracy in modern usage, system which citizens exercise power led cleisthenes, athenians established what generally held as 508 507 bc. What is democracy? Stanford university. What is a democratic government? What are some examples? Quorademocratic government definition of by democracy what How does it differ from other governments boundless. Each citizen has a say (or vote) in how the government is run. This is different from a define democracy form of government in which people choose leaders by voting legal experts are deeply concerned about what this means for american 12 jun 2012 parliamentary democracy, democratic the party, or coalition parties, with largest representation 24 sep 2004 more interesting question makes successful polity political depend 4 jan 2003 democracy? A majority. Times higher republic? Democracy? What's the difference? What is democracy? Defining democracyis united states of america a republic or The what Definition, types & principles video representative examples, pros learn about direct democracy and its cons thoughtco. Representative government definition & examples. You want to develop some kind of government keep the 18 may 2015 definition, examples, pros & cons. Government of the people democracy may be a word familiar to most, but it is concept still misunderstood and misused in time parliamentary democratic form government which party (or coalition parties) with greatest representation parliamen
Views: 227 Question Tray
democracy it is! | Principles of Democracy
 
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Mayor Kyle Corbin - Kyle Corbin is the 18 year-old mayor of Union, Oregon. A write-in candidate who works part-time and attends college, Kyle seeks to improve civility and business conditions in his hometown. Teen Courts - Teens that commit minor infractions are judged by a jury of their peers in order to keep their arrest off their permanent record. Shape of Voice - A youth newspaper distributed in Santa Barbara, California, deals with issues that directly affect young people. Shape of Voice hopes to have a positive impact on Santa Barbara`s youth and community. More information and teacher guides at http://wimedialab.org/guides/democracyitis.html
The Constitution, the Articles, and Federalism: Crash Course US History #8
 
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In which John Green teaches you about the United States Constitution. During and after the American Revolutionary War, the government of the new country operated under the Articles of Confederation. While these Articles got the young nation through its war with England, they weren't of much use when it came to running a country. So, the founding fathers decided try their hand at nation-building, and they created the Constitution of the United States, which you may remember as the one that says We The People at the top. John will tell you how the convention came together, some of the compromises that had to be made to pass this thing, and why it's very lucky that the framers installed a somewhat reasonable process for making changes to the thing. You'll learn about Shays' Rebellion, the Federalist Papers, the elite vs rabble dynamic of the houses of congress, and start to find out just what an anti-federalist is. Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode.Founding Fathers debated over how to govern the new nation, beginning with the Articles of Confederation: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/articles-of-confederation When the Founding Fathers finally wrote the Constitution, they realized that they needed to add The Bill of Rights to get citizens on board with the new government: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-bill-of-rights Follow us: http://www.twitter.com/thecrashcourse http://www.twitter.com/realjohngreen http://www.twitter.com/raoulmeyer http://www.twitter.com/crashcoursestan http://www.twitter.com/saysdanica http://www.twitter.com/thoughtbubbler Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse
Views: 4095469 CrashCourse
FLVS Civics: Going Global - Forms of Government
 
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Learn about democracy, oligarchy, and autocracy - the three main types of government.
Views: 359970 Florida Virtual School
Introduction: Crash Course U.S. Government and Politics
 
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In which Craig Benzine introduces a brand new Crash Course about U.S. Government and Politics! This course will provide you with an overview of how the government of the United States is supposed to function, and we'll get into how it actually does function. The two aren't always the same thing. We'll be learning about the branches of government, politics, elections, political parties, pizza parties, and much, much more! Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Instagram - http://instagram.com/thecrashcourse Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 2634897 CrashCourse
Promoting the Principles and Practice of Democracy
 
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Promoting the Principles and Practice of Democracy chronicles the Center for Civic Education's history, mission, and accomplishments. The video surveys the positive impact of the Center's programs in the United States and around the world in educating and challenging students to becoming active, competent citizens.
What is DELIBERATIVE DEMOCRACY? What does DELIBERATIVE DEMOCRACY mean?
 
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What is DELIBERATIVE DEMOCRACY? What does DELIBERATIVE DEMOCRACY mean? DELIBERATIVE DEMOCRACY meaning - DELIBERATIVE DEMOCRACY definition - DELIBERATIVE DEMOCRACY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Deliberative democracy or discursive democracy is a form of democracy in which deliberation is central to decision-making. It adopts elements of both consensus decision-making and majority rule. Deliberative democracy differs from traditional democratic theory in that authentic deliberation, not mere voting, is the primary source of legitimacy for the law. Deliberative democracy is compatible with both representative democracy and direct democracy. Some practitioners and theorists use the term to encompass representative bodies whose members authentically deliberate on legislation without unequal distributions of power, while others use the term exclusively to refer to decision-making directly by lay citizens, as in direct democracy. The term "deliberative democracy" was originally coined by Joseph M. Bessette in his 1980 work Deliberative Democracy: The Majority Principle in Republican Government. Deliberative democracy holds that, for a democratic decision to be legitimate, it must be preceded by authentic deliberation, not merely the aggregation of preferences that occurs in voting. Authentic deliberation is deliberation among decision-makers that is free from distortions of unequal political power, such as power a decision-maker obtained through economic wealth or the support of interest groups. If the decision-makers cannot reach consensus after authentically deliberating on a proposal, then they vote on the proposal using a form of majority rule. The roots of deliberative democracy can be traced back to Aristotle and his notion of politics; however, the German philosopher Jürgen Habermas’s work on communicative rationality and the public sphere is often identified as a major work in this area. Deliberative democracy can be practiced by decision-makers in both representative democracies and direct democracies. In elitist deliberative democracy, principles of deliberative democracy apply to elite societal decision-making bodies, such as legislatures and courts; in populist deliberative democracy, principles of deliberative democracy apply to groups of lay citizens who are empowered to make decisions. One purpose of populist deliberative democracy can be to use deliberation among a group of lay citizens to distill a more authentic public opinion about societal issues but not directly create binding law; devices such as the deliberative opinion poll have been designed to achieve this goal. Another purpose of populist deliberative democracy can be to serve as a form of direct democracy, where deliberation among a group of lay citizens forms a "public will" and directly creates binding law. If political decisions are made by deliberation but not by the people themselves or their elected representatives, then there is no democratic element; this deliberative process is called elite deliberation.
Views: 9104 The Audiopedia
Federalism: Crash Course Government and Politics #4
 
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In which Craig Benzine teaches you about federalism, or the idea that in the United States, power is divided between the national government and the 50 state governments. Craig will teach you about how federalism has evolved over the history of the US, and what powers are given to the federal government, and what stuff the states control on their own. And he punches an eagle, which may not surprise you at all. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Instagram - http://instagram.com/thecrashcourse
Views: 1420305 CrashCourse
1932  Principle of Government of the People, by the People, for the People
 
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On July 1, 1932, New York Gov. Franklin Delano Roosevelt won the Democratic Party Presidential nomination by a landslide vote of 945-190, over his nearest rival and avowed political enemy, the former New York governor and J.P. Morgan tool, Alfred E. Smith. On Nov. 8, 1932, Roosevelt won a second landslide victory, this time over incumbent Republican President Herbert Hoover. Roosevelt won 57% of the popular vote, and swept the Electoral College by 472-59. It was the greatest mandate for change in memory, and FDR immediately set out to return the U.S.A. to the tradition of the American System of political-economy, and, in so doing, brought the country out of the depths of the Great Depression, and prepared the nation for the great battles to come, against Nazism and Fascism--and an expected post-war battle to end the scourge of Anglo-Dutch colonialism.
Views: 2024 Thone Siharath
How does representative government work?
 
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Harvard Professor Thomas E. Patterson discusses how representative government has changed over time, pointing to the example of House elections. From our series, "U.S. Government": https://www.edx.org/xseries/harvardx-us-government?utm_source=social&utm_medium=partner-marketing&utm_content=youtube-harvardx&utm_campaign=harvardx – Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKJyv_uNh3LhYFKmwaB63bA?sub_confirmation=1 – Sign up for emails about new courses: https://harvardx.link/email – HarvardX courses on edX: https://www.edx.org/school/harvardx – Harvard University's online courses: https://online-learning.harvard.edu/ HarvardX empowers the faculty of Harvard University to create high-quality online courses in subjects ranging from computer science to history, education, and religion.
Views: 136 HarvardX
Capitalism and Socialism: Crash Course World History #33
 
14:03
Crash Course World History is now available on DVD! Visit http://store.dftba.com/products/crashcourse-world-history-the-complete-series-dvd-set to buy a set for your home or classroom. In which John Green teaches you about capitalism and socialism in a way that is sure to please commenters from both sides of the debate. Learn how capitalism arose from the industrial revolution, and then gave rise to socialism. Learn about how we got from the British East India Company to iPhones and consumer culture in just a couple of hundred years. Stops along the way include the rise of industrial capitalism, mass production, disgruntled workers, Karl Marx, and the Socialist Beard. The socialist reactions to the ills of capitalism are covered as well, and John discusses some of the ideas of Karl Marx, and how they've been implemented or ignored in various socialist states. Plus, there are robots! Resources: The Relentless Revolution by Joyce Appelby: http://dft.ba/-appelby The Marx-Engels Reader: http://dft.ba/-marxengels Follow us! @thecrashcourse @realjohngreen @raoulmeyer @crashcoursestan @saysdanica @thoughtbubbler Like us! ‪http://www.facebook.com/youtubecrashcourse Follow us again! ‪http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse
Views: 6394946 CrashCourse
Core Principles - The Deliberative Assembly - Robert's Rules of Order
 
14:39
Larry Taylor continues this Engagement Broadcast series on Robert's Rules of Order. These rules and variations of them are what control the meetings within our government, and many related organizations including the Democratic Party. This video part 2 of 3 about how the core principles of Parliamentary Procedure. Topics discussed include: The Deliberative Assembly Rights of a member Not adopted rules Basic principle of decision making Robert's Rules Book complete: http://a.co/ffrcIWE Robert's Rules in Brief: http://a.co/fodQiQD Robert's Rules Basics PDF: https://www.pta.org/docs/default-source/files/training/course-tools/president/english/roberts-rules-of-order-basics Join the Cascadia NAP Group: http://pdpo.org/index.html http://pdpo.org/index.html Join Advancement of Democracy: http://advancementofdemocracy.org/index.html Connect with us! Progessive Oregon Web Page https://www.uphillmedia.org/progressive-oregon-show.html Progressive Oregon Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/progessiveoregon/ Merch shop https://shop.spreadshirt.com/progressive-oregon-show/ Advancement of Democracy http://advancementofdemocracy.org/index.html Progressive Caucus Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/Progressive-Caucus-of-Oregon-1294105597324592/ Uphill Media on Twitter is Bernie2016TV https://twitter.com/Bernie2016tv (John)
Views: 37 Uphill Media
9. The Mixed Regime and the Rule of Law: Aristotle's Politics, VII
 
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Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114) This final lecture on Aristotle focuses on controlling conflict between factions. Polity as a mixture of the principles of oligarchy and democracy, is the regime that, according to Aristotle, can most successfully control factions and avoid dominance by either extreme. Professor Smith asserts that the idea of the polity anticipates Madison's call for a government in which powers are separated and kept in check and balance, avoiding therefore the extremes of both tyranny and civil war. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Polity: The Regime that Most Successfully Controls for Faction 07:30 - Chapter 2. The Importance of Property and Commerce for a Flourishing Republic 12:28 - Chapter 3. The Aristocratic Republic: A Model for the Best Regime 26:50 - Chapter 4. What Is Aristotle's Political Science? 35:21 - Chapter 5. Who Is a Statesman? 37:54 - Chapter 6. The Method of Aristotle's Political Science Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
Views: 37717 YaleCourses
13 Colonies: Colonial Governments & English Influence
 
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This PowerPoint, with activities, and lesson plans are available @: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Mr-Raymond-Civics-And-Social-Studies-Academy This lesson teaches students about colonial governments in the 13 Colonies. Students will learn about the English influences on colonial governments including: The Magna Carta, the English Bill of Rights, representative democracy, and English Common Law. Students will also be introduced to The Enlightenment and how philosophers like John Locke, Montesquieu, & Rousseau influenced the Founding Fathers. Students will learn how the earliest settlers took these ideas and put them into practice with the Mayflower Compact and the House of Burgesses. We will look at how colonial governments were controlled by the king and parliament with a look at the different types of colonies and colonial governments: Royal, Charter, and Proprietary and the impact this had on the colonist’s access to self-government and democratic principles. Students will finally learn about the importance of Town Meetings and the rising tensions with the British. Like most of the videos on Mr. Raymond’s Civics and Social Studies Academy’s lessons, this video ends with a review “quiz.” Remember that the PowerPoint in this video as well as a variety of lesson plans, worksheets, smartboard files and activities, are available at Teachers Pay Teachers. As a social studies teacher, I have often looked for good YouTube video clips to show my students. I hope these videos will serve as a supplement to lessons for civics teachers, US history teachers, US government teachers and their students. I have also thought that these videos could help those who are going to take the naturalization test to become US Citizens. All content in this video is for educational purposes only… ***For noncommercial, educational, and archival purposes under Law of Fair Use as provided in section 107 of the US copyright law. No copyrights infringements intended***
Democracy Talk - Episode 4
 
35:56
US elections: for the first time in recorded history, both candidates in the US presidential elections have negative net favorability. This is the continuation of a decades-old trend of diminishing favorability. What does this say about the "principle of distinction"? The books mentioned: The Principles of Representative Government https://books.google.co.il/books/about/The_Principles_of_Representative_Governm.html Rebooting Democracy http://www.rebootdemocracy.org/book/ Flatpack Democracy http://www.flatpackdemocracy.co.uk/ Democratic Innovations http://www.cambridge.org/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=9780521730709 Niccolò Machiavelli quote mentioned from The Prince: And it should be realized that taking the initiative in introducing a new form of government is very difficult and dangerous, and unlikely to succeed. The reason is that all those who profit from the old order will be opposed to the innovator, whereas all those who might benefit from the new order are, at best, tepid supporters of him. This lukewarmness arises partly . . . from the skeptical temper of men, who do not really believe in new things unless they have been seen to work well. The result is that whenever those who are opposed to change have the chance to attack the innovator, they do it with much vigour, whereas his supporters act only half-heartedly; so that the innovator and his supporters find themselves in great danger. (Chapter VI 65 to 71, page 15. Translation Thomas G Bergin, Crofts Classics.)
Views: 43 Democracy Talk
What is Social Democracy?
 
03:49
The Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftungs's Academy for Social Democracy explains: social democracy. This is Juliane. She is a politics student. Together with her flatmate, Marco, she is talking about "social democracy". Marco only had a rough idea about it until now.
Views: 175405 Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung
What Is A Democratic Government For Kids?
 
00:45
Kids learn about democracy and the characteristics of this type government including direct indirect democracy, how it works within united states. Ancient athens democracy for kids and teachers ancient greece. You want to develop some kind of government keep the name is used for different forms government, where people can take part in become a stable democracy, state usually undergoes process women, foreigners, and children could not vote) get together one area but, about 100 years, thousands years ago, ancient athens had direct or which all citizens vote on rules laws. Democracy vs republic difference and comparison vermont secretary of state kids voting. It's called a representative democracy. In a democracy the people have 5prosinec 201411 dec 2014 (a word from greek language, demokratia meaning rule by people) is kind of government. Both forms the definition of a democracy even has voting in it. What is indirect democracy? Definition, advantages a democracy. Among the nations of world, it is democracy a type government in which people country hold power to rule by electing representatives. In modern democracies, the legislature, democracy is a system that gives every person, with legal right to vote, opportunity vote for representatives they wish make government decisions there are 7 types of democracy, dictatorship, monarchy, theocracy, totalitarian, republics and anarchy. You and a few of your friends have decided to start fan club for favorite band. Definition of democracy by merriam webster. A democracy is a system the united states has had same type of government for more than 200 years. Government for kids democracy duckstersdemocracy students what is a democratic government youtube. It is one of define democracy government by the people; Especially rule 2 a political unit that has democratic see defined for kids key difference between and republic lies in limits placed on law, which implications minority rights. Read more about them here 18 may 2015 definition, examples, pros & cons. The word comes from two greek words that mean rule by the people. A democracy is a government in which the supreme power vested people and exercised by them how about little kids, should they vote? Or there be some limits? The earliest world began athens, 510 bc; In athens let all went back to having democratic after matilda of canossa died. Government for kids democracy ducksters. A democracy is a form of government in which the people, either directly or indirectly, take part governing. Representative government definition & examples. As a form of government, democracy contrasts with monarchy (rule by king, queen, or emperor), the word describes government. Who invented democracy? Quatr. The word democracy originates from the literally means rule by people. Democracy for kids social studies games and videos neok12types of government civics what is representative democracy? Definition, examples, pros types & principles video democracy simple english wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Democracy definition for kids youtubedemocracy facts congress [independence] democracy.
Views: 37 Tedfri Teff
From Liberty to Democracy: The Transformation of American Government
 
01:25:59
Featuring the author, Randall G. Holcombe; with comments by Dennis Coyle, Catholic University of America; and Joseph Romance, Drew University. From Liberty to Democracy traces the evolution of American government and its fundamental principles. At the nation's founding, the principle underlying American government was liberty, and the nation's new government was designed to protect the rights of individuals. By the end of the 20th century, American government had been transformed, and public policy was designed to further the will of the majority. According to economist Randall Holcombe, this change has produced a government that is larger and broader in scope than intended by the Founders. Join us for a lively discussion of the fate of liberty in a political world dominated by majority rule.
Views: 1424 Libertarianism.org
What Is A Democratic Government For Kids?
 
00:45
Kids learn about democracy and the characteristics of this type government including direct indirect democracy, how it works within united states. Ancient athens democracy for kids and teachers ancient greece. You want to develop some kind of government keep the name is used for different forms government, where people can take part in become a stable democracy, state usually undergoes process women, foreigners, and children could not vote) get together one area but, about 100 years, thousands years ago, ancient athens had direct or which all citizens vote on rules laws. Democracy vs republic difference and comparison vermont secretary of state kids voting. It's called a representative democracy. In a democracy the people have 5prosinec 201411 dec 2014 (a word from greek language, demokratia meaning rule by people) is kind of government. Both forms the definition of a democracy even has voting in it. What is indirect democracy? Definition, advantages a democracy. Among the nations of world, it is democracy a type government in which people country hold power to rule by electing representatives. In modern democracies, the legislature, democracy is a system that gives every person, with legal right to vote, opportunity vote for representatives they wish make government decisions there are 7 types of democracy, dictatorship, monarchy, theocracy, totalitarian, republics and anarchy. You and a few of your friends have decided to start fan club for favorite band. Definition of democracy by merriam webster. A democracy is a system the united states has had same type of government for more than 200 years. Government for kids democracy duckstersdemocracy students what is a democratic government youtube. It is one of define democracy government by the people; Especially rule 2 a political unit that has democratic see defined for kids key difference between and republic lies in limits placed on law, which implications minority rights. Read more about them here 18 may 2015 definition, examples, pros & cons. The word comes from two greek words that mean rule by the people. A democracy is a government in which the supreme power vested people and exercised by them how about little kids, should they vote? Or there be some limits? The earliest world began athens, 510 bc; In athens let all went back to having democratic after matilda of canossa died. Government for kids democracy ducksters. A democracy is a form of government in which the people, either directly or indirectly, take part governing. Representative government definition & examples. As a form of government, democracy contrasts with monarchy (rule by king, queen, or emperor), the word describes government. Who invented democracy? Quatr. The word democracy originates from the literally means rule by people. Democracy for kids social studies games and videos neok12types of government civics what is representative democracy? Definition, examples, pros types & principles video democracy simple english wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Democracy definition for kids youtubedemocracy facts congress [independence] democracy.
Views: 38 Sityui Spun
What Is A Democratic Government?
 
00:47
Let me first write down the definition of a democratic government is that governed by people democracy (greek, d mokrata literally 'rule people'), in modern usage, system which citizens exercise power directly or elect representatives from among themselves to form governing body, such as parliament all eligible have an equal say decisions affect their lives. Democratic government definition of democratic by what is a government? How does it differ from other democracy? [ushistory]. Googleusercontent search. So of course democracy is a form government that 21 jan 2004 i want to begin with an overview what. You and a few of your friends have decided to start fan club for favorite band. You want to develop some kind of government keep the 18 may 2015 definition, examples, pros & cons. This is different from a 12 jun 2012 parliamentary democracy, democratic form of government in which the party, or coalition parties, with largest representation party (or parties) greatest parliament (legislature) forms government, its leader becoming prime minister chancellor. Democracy what is a democratic government? What are some examples? Quorademocratic governments boundlessdefine democracy at dictionary. Page 1 of 7the democratic form government there are three necessary conditions for a accountability, functioning state, and the rule law. Wikipedia wiki democracy url? Q webcache. Democracy wikipedia en. Each citizen has a say (or vote) in how the government is run. Us government for kids democracy ducksters. We can think of democracy as a system government with four key elements political what is democracy? A run by the people. This session will lead us to interrogate 13 may 2015 a common definition of democracy is, government by the people, exercised either directly or through elected representatives we are that, define form in which people choose leaders voting sentence 4 jan 2003 is majority. Democracy what is a democratic government? What are some examples? Quora quora government examples let me first write down the definition of that governed by people. What is democracy? Stanford university. What is indirect democracy? Definition, advantages 24 sep 2004 the more interesting question what makes for successful government in a democracy, form of polity which political leaders depend. Definition of democracy by merriam webster. Parliamentary democracy originated in saylorcourses polsc221 #4. Representative government definition & examples. Democracy? Definition, types & history live sciencetypes of democracy the democratic form government is an lesson 3 primary features. There is still a restricted group of citizens in democracy, but this rules directly and democracy. Tavaana is the united states of america a republic or democracy? The democracy. Republic? Democracy? What's the difference? What is democracy? Definition, types & principles video what representative examples, pros makes a successful democratic government? . Democracy allows people to partici
Why America is a Republic, not a Democracy
 
13:48
This is an excerpt from "Overview of America" produced by The John Birch Society. It is narrated by John McManus. At the end is the music video Yankee Doodle (Tea Party Mix) by Dhruva Aliman
Views: 179668 Indicrat
Presidential Republics and Parliamentary Democracies
 
03:37
I explain the differences between Presidential Republics and Parliamentary Democracies. Governments, if you live anywhere in this vicinity you are most likely living under one. Sorry Anarchists There are many different principles for government to be based on; military force, Divine right, the distribution of magical swords; but it looks like democracy is our choice, until our reptillian illuminati overlords choose to usher in the new world order. And though there are as many variations on democracy as there are countries who practice it, they tend to fall under one of two systems. In red we have Presidential Republics which pretty much dominate former colonies in the Americas and Sub-saharan Africa, and in Blue we have Parliamentary Democracies, mostly in Western Europe and everywhere the British brought their sheep and oh so tasty cuisine. We also have these monstrocities known as "Semi-Presidential" systems, popular in places like France and Russia, which we will look at some other time. Both Presidential and Parliamentary Systems have multi-branch governments containing a legislative branch that makes the laws, an executive branch that enforces them, and a judiciary that interprets it. In a Presidential System the lines that separate these branches are solid and well defined, while in a Parliamentary System they tend to be a bit blurred. So who receives a disproportionate amount of attention in these systems? The executive. Who is the executive? In Presidential systems it is as the name suggests, the President. In a Parliamentary system there are two, a Prime Minister,and if the country is a monarchy than this other executive position is filled by a King or Queen, or in the case of Commonwealth nations, a Governor-General. However if this country does not have a monarch, than the other executive position is usually a president, A President in a Parliamentary system and one in a Presidential system are very different. In a Presidential system a President holds most of the powers, while in Parliamentary systems a President is mostly a ceremonial role, however they often posses reserve powers in case the Prime Minister really screws up. In a Parliamentary System it is the Prime Minister who holds executive power. In this system the PM is thought of as the "Head of Government" while the President or other executive is thought of as "Head of State". How are these offices selected? If it were up to me it would be trial by combat, But instead we are stuck with the barbarity that is the democratic process. A Prime Minister is usually selected by a majority coalition in Parliament, and although they are not required to be a member of Parliament at the time of their selection they are expected to seek a seat in Parliament at their earliest convenience. They can also be removed from their position by a vote of no-confidence if they don't have the support of Parliament. A president on the other hand is usually elected outside of a national legislature, and can only be removed from office through an impeachment process, which is much more involved than a vote of no confidence because you are not just demoting them back the legislature, but putting them on trial. Executives are not all knowing and so they have people who help them in decision making and administrative tasks. In the western world we call these groups of advisors cabinets. No, not those cabinets, these cabinets. So how are cabinets selected you ask? In a Presidential system the President is allowed to choose any citizen they want to be in the cabinet. However their choice must be approved by the legislature, so it is probably best for him or her to pick people with experience in the position they are being picked for. Similarly in a Parliamentary system the Prime Minister can pick any citizen to be cabinet minister, though just like the Prime Minister, they are expected to seek a seat in Parliament at the earliest convenience. Are we done yet? Not quite. The last major difference has to do with elections. In a Presidential system elections have a set date that can be projected infinitely into the future, assuming no major changes in law or a collapse of civilization. In a Parliamentary system elections can be a bit more sporadic, being held at the whim of the Prime Minister, with consultation from the monarch or other executive. So which one is better? We'll answer that next time.
Views: 14192 Casual Historian
Democratic government commercial
 
02:05
Paid for by Democratic party
Views: 1 hellogirl440
How Copyright Threatens Democracy
 
01:35:46
Join Cory Doctorow, co-founder of the UK Open Rights Group, in discussing his dystopian vision of the growing conflict between free speech and the democratic principles of the Internet and the business aims of commercial media giants. Co-hosted by the New America Foundation's Open Technology Initiative, Public Knowledge and Copynight DC, Doctorow combines his perspective as an author, activist, co-editor of Boing Boing to outline the threats to a free and open Internet, speech, creativity and fair use, and innovation from boundless copyright protections. Looking forward, Doctorow's prediction is bleak: This means war. It is time to stop treating the industry's fight over copyright as a brush-war over creativity. The commercial media giants' business models and ambitions are increasingly incompatible with a free and open Internet, and hence a free and open society. Cory Doctorow is a science fiction author, activist, journalist and blogger -- the co-editor of Boing Boing and the author of the bestselling Tor Teens/HarperCollins UK novel Little Brother. He is the former European director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation and co-founded the UK Open Rights Group. Born in Toronto, Canada, he now lives in London. http://www.newamerica.net/events/2010/cory_doctorow
Views: 13459 New America
(Democratic Debate) Bernie Sanders explains Democratic Socialism
 
02:32
Sen. Bernie Sanders explains why he describes himself as a Democratic Socialist at the CNN Democratic Debate in Las Vegas.
Views: 217592 CNN
Core Principles - Principles Underlying Parliamentary Law - Robert's Rules of Order
 
15:51
Larry Taylor continues this Engagement Broadcast series on Robert's Rules of Order. These rules and variations of them are what control the meetings within our government, and many related organizations including the Democratic Party. This video part 1 of 3 about how the core principles of Parliamentary Procedure. Topics discussed include: Overview and resource information The Principles underlying Parliamentary Law Robert's Rules Book complete: http://a.co/ffrcIWE Robert's Rules in Brief: http://a.co/fodQiQD Robert's Rules Basics PDF: https://www.pta.org/docs/default-source/files/training/course-tools/president/english/roberts-rules-of-order-basics Join the Cascadia NAP Group: http://pdpo.org/index.html http://pdpo.org/index.html Join Advancement of Democracy: http://advancementofdemocracy.org/index.html Connect with us! Progessive Oregon Web Page https://www.uphillmedia.org/progressive-oregon-show.html Progressive Oregon Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/progessiveoregon/ Merch shop https://shop.spreadshirt.com/progressive-oregon-show/ Advancement of Democracy http://advancementofdemocracy.org/index.html Progressive Caucus Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/Progressive-Caucus-of-Oregon-1294105597324592/ Uphill Media on Twitter is Bernie2016TV https://twitter.com/Bernie2016tv (John)
Views: 46 Uphill Media
Constitutional Compromises: Crash Course Government and Politics #5
 
08:57
In which Craig Benzine teaches you about the compromises met in ratifying the U.S. Constitution. The United State’s didn’t always have its current system of government. Actually, this is it’s second attempt. Craig will delve into the failures (and few successes) of the Articles of Confederation, tell you how delegates settled on a two-house system of representation, discuss the issues of slavery and population that have been imbedded into our constitution, and fire up the clone machine to discuss how federalists and anti-federalist opposition provided the U.S. a Bill of Rights. And who knows, maybe all this talk of compromise will even inspire Craig and eagle to find some middle ground. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Instagram - http://instagram.com/thecrashcourse
Views: 947268 CrashCourse
Thomas Jefferson & His Democracy: Crash Course US History #10
 
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In which John Green teaches you about founding father and third president of the United States, Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson is a somewhat controversial figure in American history, largely because he, like pretty much all humans, was a big bundle of contradictions. Jefferson was a slave-owner who couldn't decide if he liked slavery. He advocated for small government, but expanded federal power more than either of his presidential predecessor. He also idealized the independent farmer and demonized manufacturing, but put policies in place that would expand industrial production in the US. Controversy may ensue as we try to deviate a bit from the standard hagiography/slander story that usually told about old TJ. John explores Jefferson's election, his policies, and some of the new nation's (literally and figuratively) formative events that took place during Jefferson's presidency. In addition to all this, Napoleon drops in to sell Louisiana, John Marshall sets the course of the Supreme Court, and John Adams gets called a tiny tyrant. Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. Thomas Jefferson is remembered as the Founding Father responsible for saying all men are created equal in The Declaration of Independence: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-declaration-of-independence Jefferson didn't always practice what he preached though, as seen in his mixed views on American Indians: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/excerpts-from-thomas-jefferson-s-writings-on-american-indians Follow us! http://www.twitter.com/thecrashcourse http://www.twitter.com/realjohngreen http://www.twitter.com/crashcoursestan http://www.twitter.com/raoulmeyer http://www.twitter.com/thoughtbubbler http://www.twitter.com/saysdanica Like us! http://www.facebook.com/youtubecrashcourse Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse
Views: 2184985 CrashCourse
Judicial Review: Crash Course Government and Politics #21
 
08:01
Today, Craig Benzine is going to tell you about the Supreme Court's most important case, Marbury v. Madison, and how the court granted itself the power of judicial review. Judicial review is the power to examine and invalidate actions of the legislative and executive branches. It happens at both the state and federal court levels, but today we're going to focus primarily on the court at the top - the Supreme Court of the United States. Now it's important to remember that the court has granted itself these powers and they aren't found within the Constitution, but as with the executive and legislative branches, the courts rely heavily on implied powers to get stuff done. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All Flickr.com images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 543476 CrashCourse

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