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Sea Snake Species Thought To Be Extinct Found Off Western Australian Coast
 
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Two critically endangered snake species last seen well over a decade ago and assumed extinct were recently spotted off the coast of Western Australia. When animals are not spotted in their usual stomping grounds for some time, experts often assume the species has gone extinct. Such was the case with two critically endangered species of snakes last seen in the Timor Sea’s Ashmore Reef area well over a decade ago.  Recent sightings off the coast of Australia have a team of scientists now thinking the creatures just relocated elsewhere.  One of the two species is the short nosed sea snake, a pair of which was seen frolicking in the waters of Western Australia’s Ningaloo Reef. Noted Blanche D'Anastasi, a member of the research group, “What is even more exciting is that they were courting, suggesting that they are members of a breeding population."  The other, the leaf scaled sea snake, was noticed moving through sea grass beds in Shark Bay, some 1,056 miles away from its last known home.  Why the two species pulled up stakes and journeyed afar is unknown, but researchers are thrilled about the sightings nonetheless.  Said D'Anastasi, “This discovery is really exciting, we get another chance to protect these two endemic Western Australian sea snake species."
Views: 5431 GeoBeats News
Short Nosed Sea Snake
 
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Created with Wondershare Filmora
Views: 205 Aaron Thomas
6 Deadliest Sea Snakes
 
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Evolving from Cobras, Sea Snakes have some of the most toxic and potent venom in the world, some can kill a thousand men in just a few drops. Subscribe for the latest videos: https://goo.gl/7xzjzR Here are 6 of the Deadliest Sea Snakes: 6 - The Yellow Bellied Sea Snake The yellow bellied sea snake is one of the most widely distributed snakes in the world and has been spotted as far north as Russia and as far south as New Zealand. Although they tend to avoid cold water, a few have been spotted of the coast of California during drastic weather changes such as el nino. The yellow belly gets its name from its distinct yellow lower half of its body with a black or brown upper body. The snake does not have many predators and the bright yellow colors warn others that it’s highly venomous. They are fairly docile, but may strike a human if picked up or handled roughly. Their venom is highly toxic and causes muscle pain, stiffness, droopy eyelids, drowsiness, vomiting, paralysis and if not treated quickly, death. 5 - The Beaked Sea Snake The Beaked Sea Snake, also known as the hook-nosed sea snake or common sea snake, can be found lurking at the bottom of the murky waters in estuaries and river mouths of the eastern Indian ocean. They are commonly found in the coastal islands of India and have been spotted near the Arabian Gulf, Gulf of Oman, and as far north as Vietnam, and as far south as Australia. The snake has a small head with a plump olive green upper body and bluish bands with a white belly. It gets its name from from having a distinct beak-like snout which is slightly curved downward.The beaked sea snake can dive as far as 100 meters below, and can remain underwater for up to hours and typically feeds on bottom feeders such as catfish. Their venom 8 times as potent as a cobra and one bite has enough toxicity to potentially kill 22 humans. Described to be “cantankerous and savage” by experts and is responsible for 90% of sea snake deaths. 4 - The Dubois' Seasnake The Dubois’ Seasnake, sometimes referred to as the Reef Shallows snake, can be found lurking in the coral reefs of Australia, Papua New Guinea, and Indonesia. It’s color can range from salmon and beige to purple and brown with patterns of dark or cream colored bands and is typically just over 1 meter long. The snake can remain underwater for for up to two hours and is It’s diet consists of mostly small reef fish such as blennies, parrotfish, surgeonfish as well as moray eels. The Duboi’s Sea Snake is mildly tempered and will only strike a diver if threatened or mishandled. 3 - The Horned Sea Snake The Horned Sea Snake, also referred to as the Spiny-Headed Sea snake, is widely spread throughout the coast of Australia and Southeast Asia, but can also be found near in the waters of Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. While most sea snakes prey on a variety of small fish, an adult Horned Sea Snake feeds mainly on gobbies, while the young feed on shrimp. The horned Sea snake is also known to be one of the most venomous sea snakes in the world, although there have been no recorded bites on humans. 2 - Banded Sea Krait The Banded Sea Krait can be found in the tropical Western Pacific Seas and the Indian Ocean. The snake gets its name from having distinct black uniform stripes that cover its blueish grey body. It averages 35 inches in length, with a large paddle shaped tail adapted for water.The Banded Sea Krait’s venom is among some of the most toxic on earth and is 10 times more potent than that of a rattlesnake. The snake is well adapted for hunting in shallow waters and coral reefs, which it uses to its advantage in catching prey, which mostly consists of eel and small fish. Although it usually hunts alone, Banded Sea Krait’s have also been known to cooperate together in large numbers as a hunting party. But unlike most other sea snakes, the Banded Sea Krait spends much of its time on land. It will often leave the sea to seek freshwater, digest food, rest, lay eggs, and shed its skin - all on land.Because the snake frequents land so much, human encounters are far more common than other sea snake. Fortunately, the snake is most always docile, even when provoked, and will very rarely bite a human. 1 - Belcher’s Sea Snake The Belcher’s Sea Snake, sometimes referred to as the Faint- Banded Sea Snake, is the most venomous snake in the world. It is said that the snake’s venom is over 100 times that of a cobra, and just a few milligrams is capable of killing over 1,000 humans. It can be found off the coasts of Northern Australia and Southeast Asia, and is commonly present in the Philippines, New Guinea, and the Gulf of Thailand. Fortunately for humans, the Belcher’s Sea Snake is quite docile and has even been said to actually be quite friendly. They will almost never bite humans unless heavily provoked, and even when they do, it is estimated that about 3/4ths of all bites on humans are dry bites.
Views: 144003 What Lurks Below
Stranded beaked sea snake, Enhydrina schistosa.
 
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Stranded highly venomous beaked sea snake found on the beech at Al-Mouj in Al-Seeb.
Sea Snake Island | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
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In this exciting adventure, Jonathan travels to Manuk, a tiny, uninhabited volcanic island several hundred miles from the nearest populated island in Indonesia, on a mission to discover why the waters of this remote place are teeming with thousands of venomous sea snakes! And if you love sea snakes, check out our adventure with sea snakes in Australia: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9gQY4m2HPYk ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com ********************************************************************** Some of the world’s richest coral reefs thrive in Indonesia. Located in the middle of the so-called coral triangle, the diversity of species and colors of Indonesian reefs absolutely amazes me every time I get the chance to dive here. This time however, it’s not the reefs I have come to film, but a remote and uninhabited island whose waters are reputed to teem with thousands of sea snakes! The island, known as Manuk, is an active volcano a hundred kilometers from the nearest inhabited island, smack dab in the middle of the Indonesian archipelago. Getting there is no easy task. I have chartered the Seahorse, a traditional Indonesian Pinisi built for divers, for a special itinerary to reach Manuk Island. Divemaster Jandri meets me at the marina in Sorong. It took me 2 full days of flying just to get to Sorong from the United States! He takes me out to the Seahorse, my home away from home for the next two weeks. This expedition will take 14 divers 1200 miles across the Banda Sea, from Sorong to Alor, stopping to dive along the way at many islands, the most important of which of course is Manuk. The island is aptly named: Manuk means “bird” in several Indonesian dialects. And birds it has! Manuk is completely uninhabited and there are a few reasons why. First of all, it’s kind of steep. But more importantly, it’s an active volcano! There are steam and sulfur vents all over the island. It swims casually by flapping its flattened, paddle-like section of tail. Sea snakes are among the most venomous animals on Earth. They use this venom to hunt, and fortunately, attacks on people are extremely rare. Soon I start to see other sea snakes, and I realize that more and more have been appearing. Were they here before and I didn’t see them, or did they come out from someplace? Clearly, some were sleeping. This one is taking a nap in plain view on the reef. I guess they don’t really have to worry about predators. I watch this one sleep for a little while, and start to wonder if it’s even alive. Pretty soon I notice that as the snakes are waking up, they are coming over to check me out. Like land snakes, this is how a sea snake “smells” but at the same time, the tongue flicking helps get rid of excess salt from glands in its mouth. Because sea snakes are reptiles just like land snakes, they have lungs and need to breathe air just like people. So a sea snake must head to the surface every once in a while for a breath. Sea snakes have a huge lung that takes up nearly the entire length of their bodies so they can hold a big breath that will last a while. Each time a sea snake surfaces, it usually spends a minute or two resting and breathing, before gulping in that last big breath and diving back down to the reef. A breath can last 1-2 hours depending on the species, but most sea snakes breathe more often than that unless they are sleeping. They can also absorb a little bit of oxygen from the water directly through their skin, which helps them extend their dives. The next morning I’m up at sunrise, and heading out to the reef for an early morning dive. Early morning is when the sea snakes hunt, and I’m hoping to witness the reef alive with sea snakes on the prowl! Underwater, the light levels are still low, and I’m heading out to a deep seamount where I saw a lot of sea snakes yesterday. This should be a good place to find some sea snakes hunting. When a sea snake hunts, it takes advantage of having a small head and a thin body to go from hole to hole in the reef, poking its head inside. It hopes to corner a fish or invertebrate that’s hiding in the hole. Once the hunting starts, more sea snakes start coming in to the reef to join the hunt. On this seamount more than a hundred feet from the surface, dozens of sea snakes are gathering to prowl the reef for food. Sometimes, they appear to work together to make sure nothing escapes.
Views: 3245201 BlueWorldTV
Sea Snakes Thought to Be Extinct Found in Australian Reef
 
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Short-nosed sea snakes are spotted in the wild for the first time since 2000, more than 1,000 miles south of their only known previous habitat
11 Differences Between Eels & Sea Snakes
 
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11 differences between eels & sea snakes! From electric eels to venomous sea snakes (the most toxic sea snakes in the world), we'll highlight everything you need to know about these creatures. Type of animal Eels are a specific type of elongated fish and can be found in marine and freshwater environments. Sea snakes are reptiles and they are only found in marine environments. They are much flatter, in the vertical sense, than a snake. In addition, these fish’s heads tend to be longer and sharper. Eels also have fins, which sea snakes never have. Habitat Sea snakes are found throughout the coastal waters of the Indian and Pacific oceans. They do not occur in the Red Sea, Atlantic Ocean, or Caribbean Sea. Most sea snakes live in shallow water less than 30 meters (100 feet) deep because they need to surface to breathe yet must seek their prey near the sea floor. However, the yellow-bellied sea snake may be found in the open ocean. Behavior Eels is an ambush predator, spending a considerable amount of time hidden in caves, rock crevices, or coral reefs. When a prey animal passes by, it pounces on it. Depending on the prey type, the eel might wrap itself around it, and crush the victim until it is small enough to be swallowed, or it might tear pieces from the body and eat the prey bite-by-bite. Sea snakes are generally reluctant to bite, and are usually considered to be mild-tempered, although variation is seen among species and individuals. Conservation status The European eel is a critically endangered species. Since the 1970s, the numbers of eels reaching Europe is thought to have declined by around 98%. Nostrils Nostrils of sea snakes are equipped with moveable valves that prevent water to enter the nose when they are under the water. The tubular nostrils spotted on eels are believed to help them detect prey. Size and diet Depending on the species, eels can grow to be anywhere between 4 inches to 11 1/2 feet long. However, most sea snakes grow to sizes between 3.9 to 4.9 feet long. Largest sea snake can reach 9.8 feet in length. Eels are carnivorous, meaning they are meat eaters. They eat a variety of animals such as worms, snails, frogs, shrimp, mussels, lizards and other small fish. Gills Eels have gills, as most other fish do, and filter air from the water in order to breathe. This means that they never have to go to the surface. Snakes, on the other hand, do not have gills, but lungs. Sea snakes can dive to the depth of 300 feet. On average, they dive for 30 minutes. Sea snakes can survive for more than 10 years in the wild. Mating season Mating season of sea snakes depends on the species. Only several species will lay eggs on the solid ground. Most species give birth to live snakes. Females give birth once in two year. he gestation period varies wildly, anywhere between 4 and 11 months, and is dependent on a number of factors, including abundance of food, water temperature and the age and health of the female. Once born, the young are on their own; the adults have no parental instincts at all. The number of babies ranges from couple to more than 25. Senses Sea snakes flick their tongues to gain chemical and thermal information about their environment. Sea snake tongues are shorter than those of regular snakes because it's easier to "taste" molecules in water than in air. There is no much information about sea snake vision, but it appears to play a limited role in catching prey and selecting mates. Scales The eel’s scales are much smaller and give the animal a smoother appearance, though. Sea snakes even have a special scale that let them feel movements in the water. They developed a scaly organ on their heads which lets them "see" underwater. The sensors, known as scale sensilla, are sensitive organs that protrude from scales on a snake's head. These head-organs facilitate awareness of water movements, but the extent of their awareness isn't well understood. Venom/Poisonous Sea snakes are almost always venomous, whether it is a mild venom or, in many cases, one of the most toxic. The most poisonous one is the Beaked Sea Snake. Just 3 drops of venom can kill about 8 people! Fortunately, these snakes have short fangs and they are unable to bite through diver’s suits very easily. Other than venom, some sea snakes produce enzyme that induces digestion of the prey from the moment of bite. Symptoms of sea snake poisoning include headache, stiffness, and muscle pain throughout the body. Thirst, sweating, vomiting, and a thick-feeling tongue may result. Muscle degradation and paralysis ensue. Death occurs if the muscles involved in swallowing and respiration are affected. Because bites are so rare, antivenin is next to impossible to obtain. Eels, on the other hand, are not venomous, but can deliver a nasty bite if you offer your hand. Further reinforcing the “don’t touch” creed divers should all know well!
Views: 3986 What Lurks Below
My Worst Snake Bite Ever! EP. 422 SnakeBytesTV : AnimalBytesTV
 
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Subscribe to AnimalBytesTV for more awesome SnakeBytesTV videos and more! http://www.YouTube.com/AnimalBytesTV My Worst Snake Bite Ever! EP.422 SnakeBytesTV! Watch Brian Barczyk from SnakeBytesTV as he answers the top 5 questions fans ask! What is your biggest snake? What is your favorite reptile? What’s your worst snake bite? How can I do what you do? What’s the future of BHB? Have any burning questions???? Please ask in the comments below and Brian will be happy to answer any and all! Remember to check out Brian Wednesday 10pm EST on Discovery Channel’s new tv show Venom Hunters! Collecting Venom from Venomous snakes is vital to create anti-venom and save lives! Learn more: http://www.discovery.com/VenomHunters Venom Hunters follows 4 groups of passionate snake lovers as they are in search for venom for antivenin and medical research. Brian Barczyk and Chewy from SnakeBytesTV are one of the teams. Along with seasoned venom hunters Ed Chapman and Justin Bottrell. New comers Tim Fizter, Hannah Lockhart and Kevin Baker. And venom experts and couple Dan and Melanie Massey. This six part series on Discovery channel will take you on a high energy ride while we search for some of the deadliest snakes on the planet in search of the most sought after venom. Snakes that kill can also cure! More info at http://www.discovery.com/VenomHunters http://www.facebook.com/VenomHuntersTV http://www.twitter.com/VenomHuntersTV If you LOVED this video make sure to FOLLOW US on social media and SHARE this video! Let’s make SnakeBytesTV be one of the most popular web shows on youtube! Last Episode: Massive Snakes Invade Chicago! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r8iZ3_l47r0 WATCH OUR MOST POPULAR VIDEOS ON YOUTUBE Biggest Snakes In The World! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cOZVL4H2Uqc 5 Meanest Snakes In The World https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CaEGEr5FIwA --------------------------------- SnakeBytesTV Links --------------------------------- Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/snakebytestv Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SnakeBytesTV Instagram: https://instagram.com/snakebytes.tv Shop Gear: http://bhb-reptiles.myshopify.com SnakeBytesTV is produced by BHB Reptiles, one of the world's largest snake breeding facilities, and is hosted by Brian Barczyk. Travel with Brian Barczyk around the world as he meets some of the most unique and amazing animals and animal lovers! Watch great episodes trending on youtube like : Killer Venomous Snakes! EP. 420 : SnakeBytesTV : AnimalBytesTV New episodes every Wednesday! Keep That Passion For Wildlife! - Brian Barczyk ----------------------------------- AnimalBytesTV Links ----------------------------------- Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AnimalBytesTV Buy Merch: http://bhb-reptiles.myshopify.com Official ABTV Website: http://animalbytes.tv/ AnimalBytesTV is the first online animal network produced FOR animal lovers BY animal lovers. Each weekday you'll get original animal shows produced by wildlife experts from around the globe. Our mission statement is to bring back educational and entertaining wildlife programming with a strong message of conservation. We are animal and nature lovers here at AnimalBytesTV and we want to bring you along with us on our journey to the wild side. Monday through Friday you'll get original wildlife series including the networks originator SnakeBytesTV. Check back often and make sure to subscribe.
Views: 987519 AnimalBytesTV
Sea Turtle with Straw up its Nostril - "NO" TO PLASTIC STRAWS
 
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This is the original video! Filmed by Christine Figgener, marine biologist at Texas A&M University. ***WARNING: Graphic Content & Inappropiate/ Strong Language!*** This video shows graphically why plastic waste is detrimental to marine life, especially single-use plastics (such as straws, which are one of the most redundant items). This turtle suffers from an item that is human-made and used by most of us frequently. The research team around Christine Figgener (Texas A&M University) found a male Olive Ridley sea turtle during an in-water research trip in Costa Rica. He had a 10-12 cm PLASTIC STRAW lodged in his nostril and they removed it. SAY "NO" TO PLASTIC STRAWS, AND ANY KIND OF ONE-TIME USE PLASTIC ITEMS! If you would like to support our research and conservation efforts in Costa Rica, please think about donating to our GoFundMe Campaign http://gofundme.com/wuhvd6zj UPDATES The Plastic Pollution Coalition just launched their "No Straw" Campaign in collaboration with us. Take the No-Straw-Pledge and learn more: http://www.plasticpollutioncoalition.... ----- The Story behind the viral video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nLN52... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4MPHb... OUR STORY: My research team found a male Olive Ridley sea turtle during an in-water research trip in Costa Rica. He had a 10-12 cm PLASTIC STRAW lodged in his nostril. After initially thinking that we are looking at a parasitic worm, and trying to remove it to identify it, we cut a small piece off to investigate further and finally identified what we were REALLY looking at. After a short debate about what we should do we removed it with the plier of a swiss army knife which was the only tool available on our small boat (not intended for overnight stays), since we were on the ocean, in a developing country, a few hours away from the coast and several hours away from any vet (probably days from any vet specialised in reptiles, not to mention sea turtles) and x-ray machines. Plus, we would have incurred a penalty (up to time in jail) on ourselves by removing the turtle since that is beyond our research permits. He did very obviously not enjoy the procedure very much, but we hope that he is now able to breath more freely. The blood from the shoulder is from a 6mm skin biopsy we took previously to this event for a genetic study (part of our permitted research), which usually doesn't bleed much, but which started bleeding while restraining the turtle. We disinfected the air passageway with iodine and kept the turtle for observation before releasing him back into the wild. The bleeding stopped pretty much immediately after the removal of the straw, and when we released him, he swam happily away. The turtle very likely swallowed the straw while ingesting other food items and then either expelled the straw together with the redundant sea water through her nostrils, or regurgitated the straw and it ended up in the wrong passageway. The nasal cavity of sea turtles is connected directly to the palate (roof of the mouth) by a long nasopharyngeal duct. Copyright: Christine Figgener To use this video in a commercial player or in broadcasts, please email [email protected] If you are interested in following my adventures in the world of marine turtles and ocean conservation, make sure to also follow me on Social Media: IG http://bit.ly/2Ky4DR5 - @ocean_amazon Twitter http://bit.ly/2lJpu64 - @ChrisFiggener Facebook http://bit.ly/2MBeFyp - @cfiggener http://puranatura.zenfolio.com/ Contact Email: [email protected] http://www.bio.tamu.edu/index.php/directory/graduate-student-figgener/ Christine Figgener, Dipl.-Biol. (M.S.) ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- BACKGROUND What are single-use plastic items? http://www.greeneriepa.org/single-use... http://singleuseplastic.co.uk/what-we... What can you do? REDUCE (REFUSE=STRAWS)/ RE-USE/ RECYCLE http://www.recycling-guide.org.uk/rrr... Organise your own beach cleanups! An amazing plastic clean-up project is the TWO HANDS PROJECT, collect trash and post it on facebook! https://www.facebook.com/twohandsproject http://www.twohandsproject.org/ MORE INFO: http://micro2016.sciencesconf.org/ http://www.kcet.org/news/redefine/red... http://www.plasticchange.org/en/om-pl... http:/theoceancleanup.com
Views: 34585603 Sea Turtle Biologist
Plastic Fork Removed From Sea Turtle's Nose
 
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Video recorded by Sean A. Williamson. This olive ridley sea turtle was found with a plastic fork stuck inside its nostril. Lamentably, this is a consequence of a world of single-use, non-biodegradable plastic. There is a solution and it lies in our own decisions. Please say no to all single-use plastic. Every plastic straw, plastic bag, or plastic bottle that ends up in the oceans could mean the difference between life or death for any number of marine animals. The choice is easy. There are sustainable alternatives to single-use plastics. Canvas bags can replace plastic bags, bamboo cutlery can replace plastic cutlery. Please be part of the movement away from single use plastics. Nathan J. Robinson and the Las Baulas field team were able to remove the fork and the turtle returned to the ocean breathing freely! To learn more about our work and support sea turtle conservation, please visit: https:/www.leatherback.org Or our facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/leatherbacktrust. Share, like, and subscribe!
Views: 9501356 The Leatherback Trust
Shark Vs. Sea Snake
 
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http://www.morningstarr.co.uk/forum/natter/29035-shark-vs-snake.html#post293947 This is a great video taken by a camera on the Great Barrier Reef.
Views: 20439543 The Morningstarr*
Sea snake hunting
 
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Banded sea snake hunting. Bali, Indonesia.
Views: 243 Roser Gari Perez
Top 10 Rarest Snakes In The World
 
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Top 10 Rarest Snakes In The World Most of the human inside the international fears via the name ‘Snake’. It is a worry this is injected amongst maximum of the humans from their very youth. But do you maintain the statistics that snake own family is in a fantastic fear. Yes they may be in extraordinary chance as some snakes are sincerely becoming rare in the international. Some species of snakes are very hard to be located these days. Snake fans make a number of marketing campaign to store these adorable creatures. 1. Aruba Island Rattle Snake 2. Short Nosed Sea Snake 3. Antiguan Racer 4. Alcatrazes Lancehead 5. Vipera darevskii 6. Round Island Boa 7. Saint Lucia racer 8. Vipera orlovi 9. Santa Catalina Island Rattlesnake 10. Vipera wagneri Information Source : http://tailandfur.com Help Us In Growing Our Channel 👍.Please Like, Comment, Subscribe & Share 🍹👌 ✅ World Top Best ✅ https://www.youtube.com/c/WorldTopBest Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WorldTopBest/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/WorldTop_Best We Use The All Information We Collect From Google Search, Wikipedia And Other Place , Create Video By Video Editor. This Channel Is About Various Topics Of Top 10 List From All Over The World Like Technology, Media, Sports, Country, Celebrity, Animals, Foods, Games, Education, Facts #WorldTopBest #top10list #top10
Views: 542 World Top Best
5 Extinct Creatures Found on Camera
 
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5 rare creatures that were once declared extinct until they were recently caught on camera... Soundtrack: "Natural Selection" by ALEX ► https://youtu.be/9eOOtIFDiBA Subscribe to Dark5 ► http://bit.ly/dark5 You are listening to an exclusive new track from ALEX found only on Dark5! One of my favorite new artists, ALEX's new album, Blood Club Deluxe Edition is out now! ⯈⯈ Click here to download and hear more: http://bit.ly/2zO3MEe ⯇⯇ Dark5 presents the true tales of 5 curious creatures that were declared extinct but were recently seen again on camera... including the mop-topped monkey Vanzolini Saki, the Santa Marta Toro that only comes out of hiding for red lollipops, Australia's short-nosed sea snake, the flightless notornis South Island takahē of New Zealand, and the giant Neptune's Cup sea sponge that used to be used as bathtubs.
Views: 1351134 Dark5
The Sea Turtle with a Straw in its Nostril - No To Single Use Plastics [Short Version]
 
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This video shows why plastic trash is detrimental to marine life and why especially single use plastics, such as drinking straws, are one of the most useless items made out of plastic, especially if they end up in our oceans. If you would like to support our research for the next three years, please think about donating to our GoFundMe Campaign http://gofundme.com/wuhvd6zj SAY "NO" TO PLASTIC STRAWS, AND ANY KIND OF ONE-TIME USE PLASTIC ITEMS! What are single-use plastic items? http://www.greeneriepa.org/single-use... http://singleuseplastic.co.uk/what-we... Our Story: Our research team in collaboration with Christine Figgener and Dr. Nathan J. Robinson found a male Olive Ridley sea turtle during our in-water research trip in Costa Rica. He had a 10-12 cm PLASTIC STRAW lodged in his nostril. After initially thinking that we are looking at a parasitic worm, and trying to remove it to identify it, we cut a small piece of to investigate further and finally identified what we were REALLY looking at. After a short debate about what we should do we removed it with the plier of a swiss army knive which was the only tool available on our small boat (not intended for overnight stays), since we were on the ocean, in a developing country, a few hours away from the coast and several hours away from any vet (probably days from any vet specialised in reptiles, not to mention sea turtles) and x-ray machines. Plus, we would have incured a penalty (up to time in jail) on ourselves by removing the turtle since that is beyond our research permits. He did very obviously not enjoy the procedure very much, but we hope that he is now able to breath more freely. The blood from the shoulder is from a 6mm skin biopsy we took previously to this event for a genetic study (part of our permitted research), which usually doesn't bleed much, but which started bleeding while restraining the turtle. We disinfected the air passageway with iodine and kept the turtle for observation before releasing him back into the wild. The bleeding stopped pretty much immediately after the removal of the straw. The turtle very likely ate the straw and regurgitated the straw where it ended up in the wrong passageway. The nasal cavity of sea turtles is connected directly to the palate (roof of the mouth) by a long nasopharyngeal duct. Copyright: Christine Figgener http://ocean.tamu.edu/people/students... http://puranatura.zenfolio.com/ To use this video in a commercial player or in broadcasts, please email [email protected] What can you do? REDUCE (REFUSE=STRAWS)/ RE-USE/ RECYCLE Pledge to not use straws anymore: http://www.plasticpollutioncoalition.org/ http://thelastplasticstraw.org/ http://www.recycling-guide.org.uk/rrr... ORGANISE BEACH CLEAN-UPS! An amazing plastic clean-up project is the TWO HANDS PROJECT, collect trash and post it on facebook! https://www.facebook.com/twohandsproject http://www.twohandsproject.org/ MORE CAMPAIGNS AND INFOS: http://micro2016.sciencesconf.org/ http://www.kcet.org/news/redefine/red... http://www.plasticchange.org/en/om-pl... http://theoceancleanup.com
Views: 407429 Sea Turtle Biologist
Top 10 Rarest Snakes In The World
 
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Thanks for watching I hope you enjoyed. Please like and subscribe. Sorry that I could not put the facts about the last two snakes but I have the link to the website right here http://listverse.com/2014/09/14/top-10-rarest-snakes-in-the-world/ 10. Wagner’s Viper Vipera wagneri, or the ocellated mountain viper, is a venomous viper found in northwest Iran and eastern Turkey. This snake lives at altitudes of over 1,500 meters (5,000 ft) and prefers rocky or grassy areas. In 2008, the status of the Wagner’s viper was changed to critically endangered as it was feared that the planned construction of a dam within its limited habitat range would devastate the viper’s population. 9.Alcatrazes Lancehead This snake, whose scientific name is Bothrops alcatraz, is a critically endangered viper that lives on a small island off the southeastern coast of Brazil. This snake derives its name from the island that it lives on, Ilha de Alcatrazes, a tiny rock of only 1.35 square kilometers (0.5 mi2) that forms part of the Alcatrazes archipelago. This snake faces a unique threat to its continued survival—the island is frequently used as a naval target area, endangering the lives and habitat of these rare snakes. 8. Santa Catalina Island Rattlesnake The Santa Catalina Island rattlesnake, or Crotalus catalinensis, is a small, slender pit viper found only on the island of Santa Catalina in the Gulf of California. This rattlesnake is unique because of its lack of a functioning rattle. It is believed that this rattlesnake lost its rattle in an attempt to better adapt to its environment, allowing it to silently sneak up on birds in desert brush. Their population is facing severe challenges due to the presence of feral cats, which prey on the snakes. 7. Antiguan Racer Formerly the world’s rarest snake, Alsophis antiguae has made something of a comeback due to concerted conservation efforts. The Antiguan racer is located on a few small islands just off the Caribbean island nation of Antigua and Barbuda. The Antiguan racer was previously living on the main island of Antigua, but was wiped out after the introduction of the mongoose and black rat. However, a small population of racers managed to survive on Great Bird Island, a low-lying islet located just a couple miles off the shore of Antigua. 6. Darevsky’s Viper Vipera darevskii is a venomous viper which can only be found in northwestern Armenia and northeastern Turkey. The viper is named after Ilya Darevsky, who was one of the first to find and identify the species. Due to the destruction of its natural habitat from overgrazing by domestic animals, the numbers of Darevsky’s vipers are on the decline. At last count there were only about 500 individuals left in the wild, placing this snake on the brink of extinction. 5. Short-Nosed Sea Snake The Sahul reef snake, otherwise known as the short-nosed sea snake, is a critically endangered sea snake whose habitat is mostly contained in a small area off the coast of North Western Australia. This snake, whose scientific name is Aipysurus apraefrontalis, derives its name from the fact that it has a small head and a short, pointed snout. The Sahul reef snake prefers sandy areas with sparse coral and can live up to 10 years in the wild. It has so far only been found within the area of two reefs—Ashmore and Hibernia. 4. Round Island Boa Casarea dussumieri, otherwise known as the Round Island keel-scaled boa, is found only on Round Island, Mauritius. Adults can reach up to 1.5 meters (5 ft) in length. They’re dark brown on their upper side, and their bellies are lighter with a smattering of dark spots. The snake gets its name from small, keeled scales that cover its body. The species has recently been reintroduced to another island, Gunner’s Quoin, and although there were less than 250 mature Round Island boas in 1996, their numbers have now increased to around 1,000. 3. Aruba Island Rattlesnake The Aruba Island rattlesnake, or Crotalus unicolor, is a critically endangered rattlesnake that is endemic to the Caribbean island of Aruba, located just off the coast of Venezuela. The snakes usually have a uniform gray or light brown body color, although they sometimes have diamond-shaped markings on their backs. The snake is nocturnal during the hot summer months but will venture out during the cooler early-morning and late-afternoon periods. The rattlesnake is viviparous, which means that it gives birth to live young rather than laying eggs. It has an estimated lifespan of up to 20 years, and its diet is made up of mainly rodents, birds, and lizards.
Views: 1955 Cotton Candy
Sea Snakes🐍,Best HD Documentry In The World | Latest Facts | The Animal Adventure |
 
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The Animal Adventure Youtube Channel.. Sea Snakes Facts, Sea snakes seem pretty cool. Although all snakes can swim, sea snakes live mostly in the water. They do need to come up for air but can stay under water for up to an hour! Wow, try holding your breath that long! Since they need air regularly they are usually found in shallow waters of the Indian Ocean, and warmer areas of the Pacific Ocean. They eat fish, fish eggs and eels that they find under rocks and in reefs. There are about 30-50 different types of sea snakes and they belong to the Cobra family. The average Sea snake grows to about 2 meters long and has a smallish head for its body size. Their tails are flattened to make fast swimming possible and flaps over their nostrils close when they are underwater. Sea snakes are very poisonous. The most poisonous one is the Beaked Sea Snake. Just 3 drops of venom can kill about 8 people! Fortunately, these snakes have short fangs and they are unable to bite through diver’s suits very easily. They are not likely to bite unless threatened. Their other methods of defense include to spray a stinky, musky liquid or to poop. Eew! Eels are sometimes mistaken for Sea Snakes. Eels are part of the fish family and have gills for breathing. Sea snakes do not have gills but lungs instead and need to go to the surface for air. Sea Kraits are one of the few sea snakes that go to land to lay their eggs while most others, like the Olive sea snake will give birth in the water. All the images have been taken from google(free to use or share even commercially) and video is creative common. Music credit Kevin Macleod_The complex https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iLd-inVgFaM #TheAnimalAdventure #Snakes #Trending Friends you can also follow me on instagram https://www.instagram.com/animalhouse114/?hl=en Facebook https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100027713464448 Thanks for Watching By TheAnimalAdventure The Animal Adventure
prehistoric predators giant bear
 
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documentary
Views: 3752922 King Ashur
If You Ever See This on the Beach, Cry for Help!
 
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How do you recognize something that you can touch and something you have to run away from as fast as possible? Here is a list of the most dangerous sea creatures you can meet and how to recognize them! There are so many different species living in the ocean! Some of them are beautiful, some are deadly, and some are both. TIMESTAMPS Fire Coral 0:40 Flower Urchin 1:20 Cone Snail 1:50 Portuguese Man-of-War 2:32 Snea snakes 3:54 Lionfish 4:51 Chironex 5:39 Surgeonfish 6:15 Indonesian needlefish 6:59 Triggerfish 7:34 SUMMARY - Fire Coral. These small organisms can sting, and the effect can be not very serious and it can be quite bad. A stung person may have severe pains, feel nauseated and even vomit, which is not the best thing to do when you are underwater. - Flower Urchin is both very beautiful and very deadly. It contains toxins that can cause anaphylactic shock, convulsions and finally death. You can get poisoned if you step on it when you are in the sea or the ocean. - Scientists say that just one drop of the cone snail’s poison is enough to kill 20 people! Just one drop! - The most mind-blowing fact about Man-of-War is that technically we should call it Men-of-War, and refer to it not as «it», but «they», and here is why: it’s an animal that is made up of a colony of organisms cooperating together. Man-of-war has tentacles that can be 30 feet long, which it uses to paralyze and kill fish and other small creatures. - Sea snakes are much more venomous than their land-living friends. As it turns out, they have to be like that because they hunt fish, so what they need to do is immobilize their prey very quickly not to let it escape. - Many people call the lionfish the most beautiful sea creature in the world. You can find them in the Caribbean and Eastern Atlantic. Lionfishes are not deadly — they do have a venom, but it’s not lethal. However, the pain you will experience if you get stung is so severe that people say you might wish you were dead. - Chironex doesn’t have any teeth, but it’s dangerous as hell. If a person gets stung, they will have excruciating pain, red inflammation in the stung area and heart dysfunction. - Surgeonfish are easily spooked, so you should be extra careful if you see one of them. Don’t make any unexpected fast moves. The good news is, surgeonfish are not aggressive unless, of course, you provoke them. - Indonesian needlefish live in tropical and subtropical waters of the oceans. They, as the name suggests, have a very sharp, needle-like beak, and they are especially dangerous when they hurl themselves out of the water. - Triggerfish is mostly friendly, but only until you are a threat to its nest. The most dangerous are females — if you approach its nest even accidentally, it will bite you. Thankfully, the bites aren’t poisonous, but triggerfish have extremely sharp teeth, so the injuries it can cause need serious medical attention. If you know about any other sea animals that we haven’t told about, let us know in the comment section below! Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ SMART Youtube: https://goo.gl/JTfP6L 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 16854099 BRIGHT SIDE
Guy gets bit by extremely venomous snake
 
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I was bitten by a puff adder (venomous snake in Africa). WARNING: Graphic Content. Source & embed code: https://rumble.com/v33gi2-puff-adder-bite.html. For licensing, please email [email protected]
Views: 155776 Rumble Viral
'Venom Man' Lets Deadliest Snakes Bite Him
 
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SUBSCRIBE to the Barcroft network: http://bit.ly/Oc61Hj AN AMATEUR scientist can shockingly take back-to-back bites from the world’s deadliest snakes on purpose and claims to be making himself immune from their venom. Divorced Tim Friede, 37, has self-inflicted more than 160 bites in 16 years of research and is hoping his experiments will help to develop a human vaccine for snake bites.To prove his self-immunisation theory works, Tim from Wisconsin, USA, recently took back-to-back bites from two of the world’s deadliest snakes – a taipan and a black mamba whose bite can kill in minutes. Unsurprisingly, his obsession with saving the tens of thousands of lives lost every year to snakebites has nearly killed him on a number of occasions and also cost him his marriage. His wife Beth Friede, 35, divorced him in October after 20 years together when she finally had enough of Tim’s snake obsession. Despite the controversial nature of his experiments Tim does have some backing from the scientific community. Dr Brian Hanley, a PhD Microbiologist from the University of California, says a test suggests Tim now has twice the number of antibodies and hopes his company Butterfly Sciences will help him develop his vaccine and find investors to get it into the field. Videographer / Director: Ruaridh Connellan Producer: Dan Howlett, Nick Johnson Editor: Ian Phillips Barcroft TV: https://www.youtube.com/user/barcroftmedia/featured Barcroft Cars: https://www.youtube.com/user/BarcroftCars/featured Bear Grylls Adventure: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzcUNwS7mypzPhW4gsjO7og/featured For more of the amazing side of life: For the full story, visit BARCROFT.TV: http://www.barcroft.tv/ Like BARCROFT TV on Facebook: https://www.Facebook.com/BarcroftTV Follow @Barcroft_TV on Twitter: https://www.Twitter.com/Barcroft_TV Check out more videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/barcroftmedia/videos
Views: 11328208 Barcroft TV
Beware of Snake at Juhu Beach - Mumbai
 
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SEA SNAKES AND WATER SNAKES Sea snakes seem pretty cool. Although all snakes can swim, sea snakes live mostly in the water. They do need to come up for air but can stay under water for up to an hour! Wow, try holding your breath that long! Since they need air regularly they are usually found in shallow waters of the Indian Ocean, and warmer areas of the Pacific Ocean. They eat fish, fish eggs and eels that they find under rocks and in reefs. There are about 30-50 different types of sea snakes and they belong to the Cobra family. The average Sea snake grows to about 2 meters long and has a smallish head for its body size. Their tails are flattened to make fast swimming possible and flaps over their nostrils close when they are underwater. Sea snakes are very poisonous. The most poisonous one is the Beaked Sea Snake. Just 3 drops of venom can kill about 8 people! Fortunately, these snakes have short fangs and they are unable to bite through diver’s suits very easily. They are not likely to bite unless threatened. Their other methods of defense include to spray a stinky, musky liquid or to poop. Eew! Eels are sometimes mistaken for Sea Snakes. Eels are part of the fish family and have gills for breathing. Sea snakes do not have gills but lungs instead and need to go to the surface for air. Sea Kraits are one of the few sea snakes that go to land to lay their eggs while most others, like the Olive sea snake will give birth in the water. -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Aeroplane Almost Crashed # Must Watch" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tWNxvOhreX4 -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 380372 NS Viral Video's
Short Nosed Garter Snake
 
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Found this lovely fellow in my yard while cleaning things up.
Views: 28 BronzeWingleader
Mythical Creatures that Turned Out To Be Real
 
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Folktales are fun to hear about, but sometimes fictional stories are based on truth. Here are some creatures from mythology that turned out to be real! Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr Watch our "Evidence That Aliens HAVE Visited Earth " video here:- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iL227eb9FSI Watch our "CRAZY Ideas That Actually Worked!" video here- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v0n2wEAiOcg Watch our UNBELIEVABLE Items Found After Tsunamis !" video here- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VNNLwdBI7Gk 7. The Mighty Rhino The idea of the unicorn seemed to come from several animals. A modern one we’re more familiar with is the rhino. Yup, that’s right! People used to think that rhinos were the stag-like unicorns of fairy tales. We may have Roman naturalist Pliny the Elder to thank for that mix-up. In the 1st century AD, Pliny described an animal he came across in Ancient India that he called a “Monoceros” or a “unicorn.” He detailed the appearance of a “stag” that had “the feet of an elephant,” a boar’s tail, and one black horn on its head. A few species of rhinos do reside in South Asia, so Pliny most likely saw a rhino. 6. The Bondegezou This tree kangaroo is endemic to New Guinea island in Indonesia. Dingiso means the “forbidden animal” in the Moni language. In Moni culture, the ancestral spirit known as the Bondegezou is said to look like a short man with black and white fur, with a white belly and black arms. See the connection? Plus, the dingiso maintains a bipedal stance, which is why it could look like a small human standing. The dingiso was not photographed until the 1980s and scientists didn’t fully look into this animal until the mid-‘90s! 5. Are Dolphins Serpents? When you think of a scary sea serpent, do you think of a dolphin? We’re going to take a wild guess and say “no.” However, because the poor visibility at sea before advanced technology, it makes sense that sea travelers in previous centuries saw schools of dolphins and thought it was one big monster. Dolphins, porpoises, and seals often jump or peak over the water when they swim. At a distance, it could appear similar to a long snake undulating over and under the surface of the ocean. 4. The Real Sea Serpent The oceans of the world are vast and mysterious. While catching sight of schools of dolphins is a likely explanation for lore about sea monsters, that doesn’t mean there aren’t other explanations. Another possible reason so many sailors in history recount seeing sea serpents is that perhaps they saw the oarfish. Technically, it’s the closest thing in the sea to a giant serpent. The oarfish grows 36 feet or 11 meters long (although there have been unconfirmed reports of some oarfish reaching 56 feet or 17 meters) and is the longest bony fish alive. Compared to their faces, their eyes are enormous, and its dorsal fin runs along its entire body. 3. Cuvier’s Beaked Whale Cuvier’s beaked whale is part of the Ziphius genus. According to Medieval fairy tales, a water owl named Ziphius would attack ships that sailed in the northern seas of Europe. Ziphius had the head of an owl and the body of a fish, its name Latin for “sword-like.” It used its sword face to demolish ships and cut through them like a sword. This nautical cryptid may have been really referencing Cuvier’s beaked whale. Sometimes called the goose-beaked whale for its pointed face that resembles a bird, this whale was first described by notable French anatomist George Cuvier in 1823. Cuvier’s beaked whale live in waters 3,000 feet or 1,000 meters deep and have the most widely distributed population of all the beaked whales. 2. The Non-Hybrid Hybrid European naturalists could not believe what they saw when they first laid eyes on the platypus. They were sure it was a hoax, that someone must have stitched two animals together. Zoologist George Shaw concluded that the platypus wasn’t real, a statement published in the science journal in Nature’s Miscellany in 1799. Its body and tail resemble a beaver’s, its beak and webbed feat similar to a duck’s, earning it the full name of the duck-billed platypus. The platypus is a semi-aquatic egg-laying mammal and is one of the few mammals that are venomous. 1...
Views: 58275 Talltanic
Top 10 rarest snake in the world
 
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Subscribe to our channel and hit that notification bell so we can update you to our new video This are the Top 10 rarest snakes in the world. 10. wagner's viper wagner's viper or the ocellated mountain viper, is a venomous viper found in northwest Iran and eastern Turkey. This snake lives at altitudes of over 1,500 meters (5,000 ft) and prefers rocky or grassy areas. 9. Alcatrazes Lancehead is a critically endangered viper that lives on a small island off the southeastern coast of Brazil. This snake derives its name from the island that it lives on, Ilha de Alcatrazes, a tiny rock of only 1.35 square kilometers (0.5 mi2) that forms part of the Alcatrazes archipelago. 8. Santa Catalina Island Rattlesnake is a small, slender pit viper found only on the island of Santa Catalina in the Gulf of California. This rattlesnake is unique because of its lack of a functioning rattle. It is believed thvat this rattlesnake lost its rattle in an attempt to better adapt to its environment, allowing it to silently sneak up on birds in desert brush. 7. Antiguan racer is located on a few small islands just off the Caribbean island nation of Antigua and Barbuda. The Antiguan racer was previously living on the main island of Antigua, but was wiped out after the introduction of the mongoose and black rat. and few of them manage to survive. 6. Darevsky’s Viper is a venomous viper which can only be found in northwestern Armenia and northeastern Turkey. The viper is named after Ilya Darevsky, who was one of the first to find and identify the species. Due to the destruction of its natural habitat from overgrazing by domestic animals, the numbers of Darevsky’s vipers are on the decline. At last count there were only about 500 individuals left in the wild. 5. Sahul reef snake otherwise known as the short-nosed sea snake, is a critically endangered sea snake whose habitat is mostly contained in a small area off the coast of North Western Australia. The Sahul reef snake prefers sandy areas with sparse coral and can live up to 10 years in the wild. 4. Round Island keel-scaled boa is found only on Round Island, Mauritius. Adults can reach up to 1.5 meters (5 ft) in length. They’re dark brown on their upper side, and their bellies are lighter with a smattering of dark spots. The snake gets its name from small, keeled scales that cover its body. 3. Aruba Island rattlesnake or Crotalus unicolor, is a critically endangered rattlesnake that is endemic to the Caribbean island of Aruba, located just off the coast of Venezuela. The snakes usually have a uniform gray or light brown body color, although they sometimes have diamond-shaped markings on their backs. 2. Orlov's Viper is native to the Black Sea region of Russia, where it is endemic to the Caucasus region. It was only in 2001 that Orlov’s viper was separated as a distinct species from the closely related Caucasian viper. This snake has a triangular head and long, venomous fangs which are folded against the roof of the mouth when not in use. Although the colors and patterns of the vipers can change from specimen to specimen, they are usually brown, gray, or yellow-gray with brown or black zigzag bands. 1.St Lucia Racer Snake Rarest snake in the world, the St Lucia racer is located on a tiny island just off the coast of St Lucia, a tropical Caribbean island. While these snakes once existed on St Lucia, they were eradicated when invasive predators such as the mongoose and black rat were introduced to the island, killing these small snakes and poaching their eggs. They were actually declared to be extinctin 1936 but were rediscovered on Maria Major in 1973, where the snakes managed to survive due to the lack of mongooses. Background music: Song: LAKEY INSPIRED - Chill Day (Vlog No Copyright Music) Music provided by Vlog No Copyright Music. Video Link: https://youtu.be/vtHGESuQ22s
Views: 49 Top 10 Learning
YBS Lifestyle Ep 15 - BIGGEST VENOMOUS SEA SNAKE EVER | First Adventure On Our Mothership
 
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Join Brodie and the Moss family as they adventure 40+ kms offshore to a remote island in the new but old YBS mothership. Crayfish, Squid, good times and free swimming with what could be the biggest Sea Snake of it's kind in the world! Hit that play button, like it and subscribe if you want more! Cheers. Support our channel + get exclusive perks https://www.patreon.com/youngbloods Get YBS products at https://youngbloods.co/ Follow us https://www.instagram.com/ybsofficial/ https://www.instagram.com/brodiemoss/ https://www.facebook.com/youngbloodsspearfishing
Views: 601066 Youngbloods
Top 10 Rarest Snakes In The World In My Opinion
 
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Top 10 Rarest Snakes In The World In My Opinion 10.Wagner’s Viper 9.Alcatrazes Lancehead 8.Santa Catalina Island Rattlesnake 7.Antiguan Racer 6.Darevsky’s Viper 5.Short-Nosed Sea Snake 4.Round Island Boa 3.Aruba Island Rattlesnake 2.Orlov’s Viper 1.St. Lucia Racer Snake
Man Catches The World's Most Dangerous Snake
 
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Subscribe to StoryTrender: http://bit.ly/StoryTrenderSubscribe Watch more: http://bit.ly/StoryTrenderPicks Submit your video here: http://bit.ly/StoryTrender ----------------------------------------------- Subscribe for more: http://smarturl.it/CatersNews These are the incredible pictures of one man’s remarkable encounter with THE WORLD’S MOST DANGEROUS SNAKE. Forrest Galante, with girlfriend Jessica Evans, travelled around the South Pacific and Indonesia in search of the region’s most beautiful and dangerous wildlife. Their, they encountered Banded Sea Kraits. With venom ten times stronger than a Cobra's, Banded Sea Kraits are the most venomous snakes in the world and extremely dangerous. Forrest's first encounter took place while spearfishing for their dinner off a remote island in Vava'u, Tonga. Director: Forrest Galante Editor: Emma Baker About us: We bring you the weirdest, wackiest and most bizarre stories from around the world. Stay tuned for daily uploads that you simply have to see to believe. Find us online: Twitter: https://twitter.com/caters_news Video Twitter: https://twitter.com/caters_video Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/catersnews Website: www.catersnews.com Welcome to Storytrender - the home of extraordinary video. We are dedicated to unearthing amazing UGC video and telling the stories behind them. Our team of journalists scour the web 24/7 to licence the latest trending videos before they go viral. We then package these up into bitesize news clips for the YouTube community. Stay tuned for verified, engaging and extraordinary stories uploaded daily. *To use or license this video please contact [email protected]* Connect with Storytrender: Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/StoryTrender Like our Facebook: www.facebook.com/StryTrndr Visit our website: www.storytrender.com Company Information: Storytrender is owned and operated by Caters News Agency Ltd, an international multimedia content provider. We supply news, picture, video and feature stories to the world’s largest media publishers. All videos aired on this channel have been licensed from their rightful owners. For media / licensing / broadcast usages, please contact [email protected] www.catersnews.com
Views: 65769 StoryTrender
Sea Snake Facts: 10 Facts about Sea Snakes
 
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Here are 10 facts about sea snakes to help gain an understanding of this fascinating and amazing creature All images used courtesy of wikipedia Videos used under creative commons license Snake Pit, Grande Barrière de Corail, Australie by Antoni Belmas https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kKV2-IBZz60 NEW Diving with sea snake in Thailand Aquagrils Underwater by AQUA GRİLS Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NjmlzPw_YA8 Synopsis Sea snakes are some of the most venomous sea creatures in the oceans. They use their powerful venom to defend themselves against attacks although they are not aggressive by nature. If one is bitten by a sea snake, the symptoms include generalized aching, stiffness, and tenderness of muscles all over the body. This can later lead to paralysis and some bites may result in death if they are not treated quickly. There are currently 62 species of sea snake and they can measure between 3.9 to 4.9 feet long. They largest sea snake can reach 9.8 feet in length. Their color and patterns on their bodies depend on the species and can be an assortment of colours from black, red, white, grey or blue. Although there are some species which are uniformly coloured. They are extremely adept swimmers and swim very quickly however when traversing dry land they are very clumsy movers. Sea snakes have moveable valves that stop water from getting into their noses and they have the ability to get rid of salt from their bodies which is excessive. Many sea snakes just prefer to swim in the shallow water and they are able to dive for up to an hour without coming up to the surface for breath. On average they will be underwater for up to 30 mins before returning to the surface. They are able to breathe whilst using their lungs and through their skin. Sea snakes are carnivores whose diet mainly consists of varying types of eggs, fish, mollusks and crustaceans. Sea snakes are able to live up to 10 years in the wild and they will mate at different times of the year. They will lay their eggs on the ground to hatch after a gestation period of usually around 9 months. They are able to give birth to up to 25 young.
Views: 23548 Stand Out Facts
Removing a plastic straw from a sea turtle's nostril - Short Version
 
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While on a research project in Costa Rica, Nathan J. Robinson removed a 10 cm (4 in) plastic straw that was entirely embedded into the nostril of an olive ridley sea turtle. Lamentably, this is a consequence of the world of single-use, non-biodegradable plastic that we currently live in. There is a solution and it lies in our own decisions. Please say no to all single-use plastic. Every plastic straw, plastic bag, or plastic bottle that ends up in the oceans could mean the difference between life or death for any number of marine animals. Video taken by: Christine Figgener.
Views: 10744126 The Leatherback Trust
10 UNUSUAL RAREST SNAKES IN THE WORLD
 
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10 unusual rarest snakes in the world despite the fear they put in many people, snakes are actually under threat in their own natural environment.it’s no wonder that there are a number of snakes that are threatened with extinction. subscribe : https://vk.cc/80d27x google plus : https://vk.cc/80d0KK -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 10 Vipera wagneri 9 Alcatrazes Lancehead 8 Santa Catalina Island Rattlesnake 7 Antiguan Racer 6 Darevsky’s Viper 5 Short-Nosed Sea Snake 4 Round Island Boa 3 Aruba Island Rattlesnake 2 Orlov’s Viper 1 St. Lucia Racer Snake ------------------------------------------- #snake #vipera #rarest_snakes
Views: 9320 Top Interesting News
Mouth-Peeing and 5 Other Extreme Turtle Traits
 
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This video was supported by KiwiCo. Learn more about KiwiCo’s seven different subscription options here: http://kiwico.com/scishow From peeing out of their mouths to being capable of living in icy water, turtles have evolved remarkable, but a little bit bizarre traits to survive. Hosted by: Stefan Chin SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It's called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at https://www.scishowtangents.org ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Huge thanks go to the following Patreon supporters for helping us keep SciShow free for everyone forever: Greg, Alex Schuerch, Alex Hackman, Andrew Finley Brenan, Sam Lutfi, D.A. Noe, الخليفي سلطان, Piya Shedden, KatieMarie Magnone, Scott Satovsky Jr, Charles Southerland, Patrick D. Ashmore, charles george, Kevin Bealer, Chris Peters ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2018/09/turtles-endangered-biodiversity-ecology-tortoise-terrapin-animals/ https://academic.oup.com/bioscience/article/68/10/771/5079873 https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2018/07/30/379933 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19575239 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26940060 https://brill.com/abstract/journals/amre/31/1/article-p97_9.xml http://jeb.biologists.org/content/205/10/1495.short https://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/3892218.pdf https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/jmor.1051720106 https://academic.oup.com/icb/article/41/6/1299/241319 https://nationalzoo.si.edu/animals/australian-snake-necked-turtle https://www.jstor.org/stable/1443705 http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.1674/0003-0031(2008)160%5B61:EAATAE%5D2.0.CO%3B2 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10577-006-1029-6 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18679815 https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/experts-temperature-sex-determination-reptiles/ https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/full/10.1098/rspb.2013.2460 https://www.nature.com/articles/nature06519 https://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/279441 https://academic.oup.com/icb/article/54/5/757/2797857 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19625321 https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/leatherback-sea-turtles-can-measure-sunlight-through-their-skulls-180952703/ https://conserveturtles.org/information-about-sea-turtles-leatherback-sea-turtle/ https://www.seeturtles.org/sea-turtle-migration/ https://www.nps.gov/pais/learn/nature/leatherback.htm https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/full/10.1098/rsbl.2015.0592 http://theconversation.com/leatherback-sea-turtles-use-mysterious-compass-sense-to-migrate-hundreds-of-miles-38519 http://science.sciencemag.org/content/177/4051/791 https://www.nature.com/articles/244181a0 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022098106001663 https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/the-decline-of-the-pig-nosed-turtle-29463559/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23125335 https://nationalzoo.si.edu/animals/fly-river-turtle https://batrachos.com/sites/default/files/pictures/Books/vitt_caldwell_2014_herpetology.pdf https://peerj.com/articles/4565/ https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00222933.2016.1180720 https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode/urea-turtle-finds-unusual-excretion-12-10-16/ http://jeb.biologists.org/content/215/21/3723 https://www.livescience.com/23893-turtle-pees-from-mouth.html http://jeb.biologists.org/content/215/21/ii http://publications.rzsnsw.org.au/doi/pdf/10.7882/AZ.2010.016 http://jeb.biologists.org/content/207/17/3099 https://zslpublications.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1469-7998.2008.00454.x http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/abs/10.1139/z03-037#.XCUO3s82qu4
Views: 244473 SciShow
True Facts About The Owl
 
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Post to FB :: http://on.fb.me/138Vd4d Tweet Link :: http://bit.ly/138WDvD music : http://www.soundcloud.com/querflote Eagle Owl: chicks and adult bird - Uhu: Jungvögel und Elterntier/Robert Meier http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IOJ9PbfzG9s Petting my pet owl/Pamela Tan http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KsVk6cYLwUw Saw-Whet Owl/MrRelhed http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hpHrZpI47VI Northern Pygmy Owl Predates on Nuttall's Woodpecker/ Sierra Willoughby http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ycpqhRduv8k Great Horned Owl (baby)/MrRelhed http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EIuFeYgwCJo Great Horned Owl skeleton/ellenm1 http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Great_Horned_Owl_skeleton.jpg Cute Baby Great Horned Owl Visits Fontenelle Forest Nature Center/Mick12321kciM http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u0OmLwrYkgA Snowy Owl - SillyBeak/MrRelhed http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ltz5Uqcj0bQ Owl/GOmultimedia https://vimeo.com/39304328 Snowy Owl - Harfang Eats/MrRelhed http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXWJDzkCRKM 800px-EulenfederTeil3/bubo1 http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/2329566344/ Northern Saw-whet OwL Jim McCormac Super Cute Baby Screech Owls at Fontenelle Forest/Mick12321kciM http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lxq-tlOpJmc Little barn Owl DaVinci/Elster Ninkheg http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-WUUiC1ZlZw Barred Owls/MrRelhed http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fUttGlFX3Yo Barn owl pellet opened to show rodent bones/ Dr. Morley Read shutterstock.com A Burrowing Owl expelling a pellet/ Norman Bateman shutterstock.com Film Footage courtesy of Shutterstock, Inc., Used by Permission
Views: 16001350 zefrank1
5 Most Unique Exotic Snakes In The World!
 
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5 Most Unique Exotic Snakes In The World! Description: Most people don’t like snakes and for good reason. The slithering reptile has evolved to become one of the most dangerous predators in the world. It has had to adapt to different lifestyles since its appearance in the age of the triceratops and velociraptor which has resulted in curious and often bizarre physical appearances. From the over 3,000 species of snakes, we have selected 5 Most Unique Exotic Snakes In The World! Lets begin! 1. Elephant Trunk Snake This snake literally does not fit in its own skin. Found primarily in Indonesia and Australia, it gets its name from its wrinkled and baggy skin, which awkwardly looks two sizes larger for the snake. The scales are large and knobby and it can grow up to 2.5 meters long. These snakes spend most of their lives under water and are ineffective hunters on land due to the lack of broad scales on their underbelly which allows land snakes to slither rapidly on land. Their diet consists of fish, including catfish and eels, and are non-venomous, resorting to squeezing the life out of their prey. The knobby scales are effective to help them hold on to slippery fish underwater. 2. Langaha Nasuta It does not get weirder than this. Also known as the leaf-nosed snake, the Langaha leads an arboreal lifestyle, hunting its prey in the trees. It has a prominent projection on its snout and is a common feature for both the male and female species. However, the males and females are distinctively different, with the males having yellowish coloration with smooth scales and a sharp “horn” while females have rougher scales with a more brownish appearance. This is one of the snakes whose gender can be identified at first sight. It is only found in Madagascar’s jungles and its venom is non-fatal but it hurts quite a bit. 3. Horned Viper This snake grows to just about 50 centimeters long, quite short when compared to some of its counterparts and the deserts of Northern Africa and Middle East are where it is commonly found. They have a devilish pair of horns over their eyes but some can at times lack this feature. Although venomous, their bite is non-fatal to humans. Its formal name, “Cerastes cerastes” was coined by an Austrian naturalist after the Greek mythical monster Cerastes, a serpent that hid in the desert sand and ambushes unsuspecting prey. It might have inspired this mythical creature, as the horned viper hides under the sand leaving only its horns, eyes and nose exposed. No one knows what purpose the horns serve but I’m sure it thinks they look good. 4. Long Nosed Vine Snake Located in southeastern Asia, this snake has an unusually long nose for a snake. It hunts primarily from the safety of trees, unlike most snakes which prefer to hunt for prey on the ground. Its excellent binocular vision allows it to strike its prey with surprising accuracy. Its green coloration, from the scales to the tongues and lightweight vine-like body allows it to move quickly through the foliage and swing from branch to branch with half of its body in the air. They feed on mostly lizards and frogs. Their venom is enough to incapacitate its small prey but can only cause mild pain and swelling when they bite a human being. 5. Atheris Hispida Native to the rain forests of Central Africa, the small but deadly viper has one prominent feature, in addition to its killer eyes, that make it look even more lethal. It has keeled, bristle-like scales making it have a feather-like appearance, hence its common nickname, feathered tree viper. The 75-centimeter long viper has long retractable fangs in its upper jaw. The male is longer than the female, unusual among snakes. The deadly venom of this snake does not have a known antidote and causes blood clotting, pain, swelling and often death, even though they are rarely spotted in human settlements. Background Music: Kevin MacLeod ~ Gregorian Chant : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B7gTmd6W8hw For copyright matters please contact us: [email protected] _________________________________________________________________ Thank you so much for watching! Smash that like button for more, make sure you share the video with your friends and dont forget to subscribe! Make sure to follow me here: https://twitter.com/Top5sFinest
Views: 1846881 The Finest
5 STRANGE CREATURES - REAL OR FAKE?
 
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Number 1 is this who knows what sent in by Zoe Nies who just wants to know if it is real or not? Well, Zoe, guess what? It turns out this thing is real. It’s a new bat species recently discovered in Papua New Guinea And it's called a tube-nosed fruit bat. It was discovered in 2011 by scientists who did a 2 month survery of an unexplored mountain region there. GIANT WHITE OWL _ FAKE john gadiana NUMBER 2 is The mysterious case of the giant owl. This photo sent in by John Gadiana claims to show a giant owl being held by texas officials. John, allthough there is no smoking gun on this one, I’m calling it a fake. Officials in Texas claim there are no owls that big in Their state.And Technical analysis of the photo shows signs of tampering. The deputy standing here is in short sleeve shirt, while this one is in a heavy jacket? Is it that much colder in the shade? Also, you can notice this concrete section here is different from this one. Oh and did I mention all the strange blurry edges on hands and things? Bumble Bee Bat - REAL Number 3 is this little guy sent in by Natalee Hernandez who just wants to know if it is real or not. Natalie, according to numerous sources it is - real. It’s called a Kitti's hog-nosed bat - also known as the bumblebee bat. Not only is it the smallest species of bat, but also one of the smallest mammals in the world. It lives in Caves along the rivers of Thailand and Burma. Although there isn’t much info on how many of them exist, they are considered endangered. SEA SCORPION - MIXED REAL AND FAKE Number 4 is a photo sent in by user Daniel launchpadger who said he saw it on Youtube. Daniel, this is an odd one because it is fake and real at the same time. The creature seen in the photo is a depiction of a real but extinct sea creature called a sea scorpion. Sea Scorpions lived on our planet millions of years ago. They were the largest arthropods ever and grew up to 2.5 Meters long. Although they died off a very long ago, this contemporary picture was created by British television for a prehistoric nature series. So the creature is real, but the photo is fake. THING FROM BRAZIL - FAKE Our Last entry today was sent in by a bunch of you guys including Zachary Jones, Leonel Hernandez, and Monis Zaidi… Guys, this thing - which some people are calling a mutant Rabbit is nothing a ugly lttle fake. It’s been reported as everything from a mummy to an alien from outerspace in all parts of the world. But the truth is it is a creation of some engineers in Brazil. According to a website called Cryptomania, the engineers created this thing while working on a hydro electric dam in the middle of the jungle. They cooked it up as a joke to scare the locals. Unfortunately, the locals were a little TOO frightened and the picture went viral on social media. Some of the engineers ended up losing their jobs over it - so for them, i guess the monster became a real force of evil. OK, well that does it for this addition of mystery creatures real or fake. Ok. well that it is it for this edition of mysterious creatures you just want to hug. If you have any weird animal pictures you come across send them to me at bills channel @gmail.com See you next time.
Views: 2275575 billschannel
5 Reasons Why Dolphins Are Awesome
 
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Dolphins aren't just smiley and cute! Jessi gives you 5 reasons why dolphins are awesome in this episode of SciShow Kids. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/SciShow Or help support us by becoming our patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow SOURCES: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/03/140305-dolphins-video-megapod-superpod-california-captain-drone/ http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/explore/nature/secret-language-of-dolphins/ http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1380093/Flippin-heck-The-dolphins-jump-high-double-decker-bus.html http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-do-whales-and-dolphin/ http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/01/140115-bottlenose-dolphins-swimming-paradox-ocean-animals-science/ http://www.wdcs.org/wdcskids/en/story_details.php?select=916 http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/animal-guide/marine-mammals/common-dolphin http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/animals/bottlenose-dolphin/
Views: 223716 SciShow Kids
Zoo Tours Ep. 29: The Unseen New World || Nashville Zoo
 
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It's an Aquarium, a Reptile House, an Insectarium, and an Aviary all in one - this is the Unseen New World: Creatures of the Americas! Built in 1998, this is one of the most diverse collections of small, tropical creatures you'll ever find. It's designed to throw away your expectations - jellyfish are next to spiders, seahorses are next to lizards - you truly don't know what you'll see next. The Unseen New World is composed of small distinguished animals set in world class displays - and it doesn't comes without a purpose. If your eyes focus away from the animals, you'll see the attraction's message that is sure to inspire. The building encourages you to think of the world's small wonders in a new way. There is no higher or lower value. That Earth's most famous creatures aren't always more important than the lesser known. Next time you're walking through nature, take a moment to search around for the Overlooked, the Ignored, the Misunderstood, the Unseen. Your journey to see animals in a whole new light begins with here, in the Unseen New World at the Nashville Zoo. Species List - Not Every Animal Was Accounted For 1. West Indes Tank: French Angelfish, Porcupine Pufferfish, Red-tailed Triggerfish, Creole Fish, Slippery Dick Wrasse, Puddingwife Wrasse, Butter Helmet, Clown Wrasse, Blue Tang, Harlequin Bass, Blue Chromis 2. Rhinoceros Iguana 3. Lined Seahorse, Dusky Pipefish 4. Trinidad Giant Cockroach 5. Giant Cuban Anole, Cuban False Chameleon 6. Haitian Giant Anole, Hispaniola Tree Frog 7. Upside-Down Jellyfish 8. Trinidad Chevron Tarantula 9. Blue Chromis, Brain Coral, Frogspawn, Acropora, Zoanthids 10. Pacific Lionfish 11. Spiny-tailed Iguana, Desert Tortoise, Beaded Lizard 12. Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake 13. Mexican Landehead Rattlesnake 14. Gila Monster 15. Black Widow 16. Brown Recluse 17. Southern Copperhead 18. Alligator Snapping Turtle 19. Indigo Snake 20. Tiger Salamander 21. Paintedhand Mudbug 22. Eastern Hellbender, Water Snake 23. Blanchard's Milksnake 24. Giant Whip Scorpion 25. Red Knee Tarantula 26. Axolotl 27. Razor-back Musk Turtle, Spotted Turtle 28. Yellow-blotched Map Turtle 29. Splendid Leaf Frog, Sabana Surinam Toad 30. Central American Banded Gecko, Annulated Boa 31. Red-eyed Tree Frog, Spiny-headed Tree Frog 32. Short-tailed Leaf-nosed Bat 33. Tiger Rat Snake, Harlequin Racer, Mexican Leaf Frog 34. Elegant Helmeted Iguana, Green-and-Black Poison Dart Frog, Panamanian Golden Frog 35. Rainbow Boa, Emerald Tree Boa, Poison Arrow Frog 36. Green Anaconda, Red-tailed Boa Constrictor 37. Dwarf Caiman, Spot-bellied Side-necked Turtle, Yellow-spotted Amazon River Turtle, Discusfish , Earth Eater 38. Waxy Monkey Leaf Frog 39. Horned Frog 40. Strawberry Poison Frog 41. Amazon Milk Frog, Monkey Anole, Surinam Toad, more 42-47. Green Basilisk, Caiman Lizard, Mata Mata Turtle, Ocellate River Ray, White-spotted River Stingray, Banded Leporinus, Black Arowana Redhook Myleus, Silver Arowana, Yellow-banded Poison Frog, Spiny-necked Turtle, Firemouth Cichlid, Pike Cichlid, Jack Dempsey Fish, Abramite Headstander, more 48. Caiman Lizard 49. Two-striped Forest Pitviper, Slender Hognose Pitviper 50. Yellow-headed Gecko, South American Green Racer 51. South American Bushmaster, Bumblebee Walking Toad, Allison's Anole 52. Eyelash Viper 53. Jumping Pitviper 54. Panamanian Golden Frog 55. Puerto Rican Crested Toad 56. Poison Arrow Frog 57. African Clawed Frog 58. Cane Toad 59. American Bullfrog 60. Aviary (Species List as Stated by the Zoo's Blog): Green Wood Hoopoe, Yellow-rumped Cacique, Red-capped Cardinal, Blue-crowned Mot-Mot, African Pygmy Goose, Black-spotted Barbet, Bruce's Green Pigeon, Croaking Ground Dove, Silver-beaked Tanager, Peruvian Meadowlark Chiloe Wigeon, Linne's Two-toed Sloth 61. Argentine Black-and-white Tegu, Red-footed Tortoise Music Credit: Leblon by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100866 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ Dubakupado by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100834 Artist: http://incompetech.com/
Views: 2481 Zoo Tours
NASAL PACKING application & removal
 
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Nasal packing is the application of sterile tampons to the nasal chambers. The most common purpose of nasal packing is to control bleeding and provide support to the septum following surgery and nasal reconstruction. It is also used to treat chronic nosebleeds (Stool et al 1996). The nasal packing is made out of synthetic open cell foam polymer of hydroxylated polyvinyl acetal. The surface is smooth so it can not stick to the tissue and reduces bacterial growth. The nasal packs are stitched together at the end of the nose. They can hold 25 times their initial weight (Martelli 2002). /NHS
Views: 37253323 ENT Compilations
Project 3
 
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(made with #spliceapp - http://get.spliceapp.com)
Views: 10 Aaron Thomas
Elephant Seal vs. Elephant Seal | World's Deadliest
 
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When two bull elephant seals square off, things can get bloody. Only one in 10 males can become king of the harem... and he'll have to throw his weight around to do it. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoWILDSubscribe ➡ Watch all clips of World’s Deadliest here: http://bit.ly/Worldsdeadliest ➡ Get More World’s Deadliest: http://bit.ly/WorldsDeadliest #NatGeoWILD #WorldsDeadliest #ElephantSeals About World's Deadliest: World’s Deadliest Predators is a new series that looks at most riveting moments of animal predation, breaking down the struggle for survival and supremacy into five action-packed episodes. Top Hunters focuses on the most feared animals in their class: animals at the top of their food chain; the hunters who are prey to no other animal. Killer Packs illustrates when predators multiply their advantage over prey by banding with others of their species to hunt. Lethal Weapons shows that the physical attributes and built-in concealed weapons have the ability to make an animal a top predator. Our Superpowers episode focuses on the animals that see, hear, and smell better than any others…and that relative to their size on are the fastest and strongest creatures on the planet. And whether it is over food, territory or sex, animals go to war within their species and against other species…Battles dissects these conflicts, from the strategy to the play-by-play. These five episodes bring together dozens of species, which are extraordinary, savage, and the World’s Deadliest Predators. Get More National Geographic Wild: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoWILD Facebook: http://bit.ly/NGWFacebook Twitter: http://bit.ly/NGWTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NGWInstagram About National Geographic Wild: National Geographic Wild is a place for all things animals and for animal-lovers alike. Take a journey through the animal kingdom with us and discover things you never knew before, or rediscover your favorite animals! Elephant Seal Animal Profile http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/elephant-seal/ Elephant Seal vs. Elephant Seal | World's Deadliest https://youtu.be/RVJduMnXAns Nat Geo Wild https://www.youtube.com/user/NatGeoWild
Views: 2603707 Nat Geo WILD
10 Amazing species of turtle everyone wants!
 
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top 10 turtle weirdest species 10 species of turtle everyone wants! WEIRD AND WONDERFUL TURTLE SPECIES TOP 10 African helmeted turtle Mata mata turtle Pink-bellied short-necked turtle Spiny softshell turtle Roti Island snake-necked turtle Cantor's giant softshell turtle (Pelochelys cantorii) Alligator snapping turtle Big-headed turtle Yellow blotched map turtle Pig-nosed turtle It's not hard to love turtles and tortoises. They're often cute in their own weird, sometimes freaky way and always fascinating. But despite how much we think we know about these reptiles, many species can take us by surprise with particularly strange adaptations and remarkable abilities. Here, we celebrate 20 species of strange and adorable turtles and tortoises. LIKE OUR FACEBOOK PAGE https://www.facebook.com/MOSTAMAZING10 FOLLOW US ON TWITTER https://twitter.com/mostamazing_10 SUBCRIBE FOR MORE INFORMATIVE VIDEOS & PRESS BELL ICON EMAIL US [email protected]
Views: 4072 MOST AMAZING TOP 10
Giant Prehistoric Bear | National Geographic
 
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In the struggle for survival, the giant short-faced bear evolved into a towering killing machine. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Giant Prehistoric Bear | National Geographic https://youtu.be/4DNAUdLMBX0 National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 326460 National Geographic
Hognose Snake (Hisses and then plays dead)
 
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Please re-share this viral video. Please Subscribe. This is for my nephew Blake Carter who is currently keeping a baby hognose snake. These are one of the neatest snakes. They mimic a cobra spreading out their necks. If you do not go away, they will eventually play dead. They will roll over on their back and stick out their tongue.
Views: 732896 Eddie Carter
MOST Adorable Tiny Animals
 
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This is a good place to have come to if you’re having a bad day. I personally guarantee that within the next ten minutes, you’re going to be feeling so much better! Enjoy our list of the most adorable animals we could lay our hands on! Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 14 - But is it real? This animal looks like it stepped right out of the film, “Fantastic Beasts and where to find them.” This is a baby short beaked echidna… called a puggle! Even the name Puggle is cute! These unique mammals actually lay eggs! 13 - Melting… Your heart will melt too when you meet Mr. Peebles, the worlds smallest living cat. His size has even been recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records. When he was already 2-years old, he weighed around 2-pounds and was a mere 5-inches long. 12 - Stay Little… If crocodiles could only stay this little! It’s hard to believe that this tiny, very sweet looking little creature grows up to be a human guzzling monster, isn’t it? Babies are called hatchlings, and they’re not dangerous – however, if you see a baby alone and you’re in the water, get as far away as possible – that mama will be there within seconds! 11 - Let sleeping squirrels lie… I know that squirrels can be a nuisance at times, but when they’re so little and are sleeping peacefully in your hands just like this one, you forget all about the other stuff! 10 - Be still my beating heart… Aptly named Thumbelina, this is the world’s smallest horse. She’s only 17-inches tall, making her only a little bigger than a domestic cat. She was born on a farm that specializes in miniature horses, but she came out even more mini than expected. She weighs 60-pounds and her added smallness is due to dwarfism. 9 - Go nuts! This is another baby squirrel that is definitely a cutie! Babies are known as kits or kittens, and when they’re born they’re blind, relying on their moms for around 2-3 months. 8 - Sealed with a kiss… This baby seal is doing the Puss in Boots eyes to perfection. I don’t care what this seal is asking for – whatever it is, he can have it! Seals and sea lions only have one pup a year, which is probably a good thing – because if they’re all as adorable as this, there’d be a lot of spoilt seals around :P 7 - Cute and Cuddly Boys… Cute and Cuddly! Skipper, Rico, Kowalski and Private knew their stuff! Penguins may look ultra-sweet, but they’re anything but! They often cheat on their partners and mother penguins have been known to kidnap baby penguins when their own haven’t survived! 6 - Cute from any angle... Look at any photograph of a baby prairie dog, and I guarantee you won’t be disappointed. They are all precious. These burrowing rodents are native to the grasslands of North America and they’re often considered as pests, as they have the ability to kill an entire crop in record time. 5 - Keep em young… Seriously, because fully-grown opossums or possums, are not nearly as sweet looking as their babies! Babies are called Joey’s, just like kangaroos and these guys have an incredible bonus working to their advantage – they have a partial or total immunity against the venom produced by several snakes. 4 - Substitute mother… This little humming bird is just captivating, and I loved the idea of putting the fake flower on the end of the syringe, so she could feel a little closer to home. Should you ever pick up a baby hummingbird to try help it, remember they can’t grow purely on sugar water. Their natural diet their mom brings consists of nectar and extremely small insects. 3 - Huff and Puff… This is a baby puffer fish, and despite his small size, can still be dangerous. It’s believed that the mother fish leaves a protective layer of poison over her baby which protects it for a while until it’s able to puff itself out and do the job himself. An adult pufferfish has enough tetrodotoxin to do away with 30 adults! 2 - Puppy Tales… Heads up – be prepared to want to have a baby and get a puppy at the same time once you’ve seen these images! Jessica Shyba took incredible photographs of her son Beau, and their 7-week-old puppy, Theo. Theo was too scared to sleep alone, which is why Beau began snuggling down with the pup with every nap taken. I’d love to say the rest is history, but it isn’t! A few years later, Beau and Theo have been joined by Evangeline, Beau’s baby sister. The cuteness ante has been upped majorly, so soak it all in while you can. 1...
Views: 4010233 Talltanic
School of Long-nosed Unicorn fish
 
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Schooling Long-nosed Unicornfish (Naso brevirostris) at Bunaken.
Views: 107 Germano NZ
Is this my MISSING Fly River TURTLE?
 
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help Kenan identify this fly river turtle. Is this the missing / lost animal? Subscribe: https://goo.gl/BecCMM | Join the KK Army: https://goo.gl/te3QAW Watch next, "how to transport a turtle or tortoise": https://youtu.be/bWJSrWtxCtY Join the Club for only $5 http://www.dollarshaveclub.com/kampkenan Thanks to our sponsor Dollar Shave Club, new members get their 1st month of the Daily Essentials Starter Set including the Executive Razor and trial-sized versions of their Shave Butter, Body Cleanser and One Wipe Charlies’ Butt Wipes for ONLY $5 with FREE shipping. After that razors are just a few bucks a month. You can support Kamp Kenan by becoming a patron on Patreon ►► https://patreon.com/kampkenan Dooblydoo THANK YOU to our most HARD CORE Patreon SUPPORTERS who help make Kamp Kenan possible every month. This Kamp shout out goes to Kenneth A Buteau III, Rainie Parker, Adriene Pickle, Charles Elders, Ms. Alix Leah McMurray, Kristin McIntosh, Ethan Bradford, Oliver Cooper, Brannon Vidmar, Priscilla Ang, Kim Watkin, Ben Neptun, Jerrod Kinsey, Dhanushkolli & Cole Wilborn! Follow Kamp Kenan: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/KampKenan Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kampkenan/ Website: http://kampkenan.com/ Check out our merch: http://goo.gl/EcsgvN Watch More Kamp Kenan: Latest Uploads: https://goo.gl/kqZn5v Ultimate Reptile How To and Care Tutorial Playlist!: https://goo.gl/KAyCyD Sunday Morning Kamp Kenan Bonus: https://goo.gl/dxVE8y Ask Kenan / Kamp Kenan Army SATURDAYS: https://goo.gl/whiZCT Best Of Kamp Kenan Videos: https://goo.gl/3dsnF7 My Favorite Reptile Gear: ZooMed Heat Pad: http://amzn.to/2xOXhml Basking Lamp Fixture: http://amzn.to/2fLRS6v Basking Bulbs: http://amzn.to/2fLWeur Slimline UVB Lamp: http://amzn.to/2emgJsA Nighttime Heat if needed: http://amzn.to/2fkCNbu Thermometer/Humidity Gauge: http://amzn.to/2fkboUE Rubbermaid Tub: http://amzn.to/2eHA3S7 Reptile Cave: http://amzn.to/2fpAQqB Natural Habitat Hut: http://amzn.to/2eme41Y Food & Water Dish: http://amzn.to/2eHGYuv Substrate: http://amzn.to/2fkIWVn Spaghnum Moss: http://amzn.to/2embkBA Food- Tortoise/Iguana Diet: http://amzn.to/2fpEBfA Turtle Diet: http://amzn.to/2fpCbOk Calcium Supplement: http://amzn.to/2emfbyz Cuttlebone: http://amzn.to/2qhiiPd About Kamp Kenan: We are Reptile enthusiasts, We know a lot about Lizards, Snakes, Turtles, Tortoises, Crocodiles, Alligators and all sorts of scaly & misunderstood creatures. We also love to learn from other animal experts who are happy to share knowledge. That’s what Kamp Kenan is all about. We love animals and we know you do too. This is why we do what we do. Animal Conservation in the Modern World matters, we're out there living it and doing it every day. This is real life, these stories are real, and our sole purpose is to educate you so that you can learn something new every day and one day perhaps get involved yourself. It's that simple. Let's create a new generation of educated Animal Enthusiasts and spread the Love!
Views: 91085 Kamp Kenan
All Poisonous Snake Which Found  in Bangladesh-বাংলাদেশের বিষধর সাপ
 
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১/ Spectacled cobra(Naja naja)পদ্ম গোখরা ২/ Monocled cobra(Naja kaouthia)খইয়া গোখরা ৩/ King cobra(Ophiophagus hannah)রাজ গোখরা, শংঙ্খচূড় ৪/ Common krait(Bungarus caeruleus)পাতি কাল কেউটে, শাহ কানন ৫/ Banded krait(Bungarus fasciatus)ডোরা কাল কেউটে, শংঙ্খিনী ৬/ Lesser black krait(Bungarus lividus)ছোট কাল কেউটে ৭/ Greater black krait (Bungarus niger), কালো কাল কেউটে ৮/ Wall's krait(Bu vgarus walli)ওয়ালের কাল কেউটে ৯/ Slender coral snake (Callophis melanurus), সরু প্রবাল সাপ ১০/ Macclelland's coral snake (Sinomicrurus macclellandi), ম্যাক্লেলান্ডের প্রবাল সাপ । ১১/ Russel viper (Daboia russelii), চন্দ্র বোড়া ১২/ Saw scaled viper (Echis carinatus), ফুসরা বোড়া সাপ, বোড়া সাপ ১৩/ Bamboo pit viper (Trimeresurus gramineus), বাঁশ বোড়া ১৪/ Pope's pit viper (Trimeresurus popeorum), পপের সবুজ বোড়া ১৫/ Spot-tailed pit viper (Trimeresurus erythrurus), দাগিলেজা সবুজ বোড়া ১৬/ Green pit viper (Trimeresurus albolabris), সবুজ বোড়া ১৭/ Mountain pit viper (Ovophis monticola), পাহাড়ি বোড়া ১৮/ Jerdon's pit viper (Protobothrops jerdonii), জার্ডনের বোড়া ১৯/ Black banded sea krait (Laticauda Laticaudata) কালো-বলয়ী সামুদ্রিক ২০/ Yellow-lipped sea snake (Laticauda colubrina) হলুদ-মুখো সামুদ্রিক সাপ ২১/ Hook-nosed sea snake (Enhydrina schistosa) বড়শি-নাক সামুদ্রিক সাপ । ২২/ Daudin's sea snake (Hydrophis nigrocinctus) ডাউডিনের সামুদ্রিক সাপ । ২৩/ Annulated sea snake (Hydrophis cyanocinctus) কালো-হলুদ বলয়ী সামুদ্রিক সাপ ২৪/ Estuarine sea snake (Hydrophis obscurus) মোহনা সামুদ্রিক সাপ ২৫/ Striped sea snake (Hydrophis fasciatus) ডোরা-কাটা সামুদ্রিক সাপ ২৬/ Narrow headed sea snake (Microcephalophis gracilis) সরু মাথা সামুদ্রিক সাপ ২৭/ Cantor narrow headed sea snake (Microcephalophis cantoris) ক্যান্টরের সরু মাথা সামুদ্রিক সাপ ২8 Malacca sea snake (Hydrophis caerulescens) মালাক্কার সামুদ্রিক সাপ ৩০/ Yellow-belly sea snake (Pelamis platurus) হলুদ-পেট সামুদ্রিক সাপ ৩১/ Large-headed sea snake (Astrotia stokesii) বড়-মাথা সামুদ্রিক সাপ ৩২/ Red-necked keelback (Rhabdophis subminiatus) লাল গলা সাপ ৩৩/ Mock viper (Psammodynastes pulverulentus) পাহাড়ি সাপ ৩৪/ Crab-eating water snake (Fordonia leucobalia) কাকরাভূক পাইন্না সাপ ৩৬/ Dog-faced water snake (Cerberus rynchops) কুকুর মুখো নোনা বোড়া, জল বোড়া ৩৭/ Tawny cat snake (Boiga ochracea) খয়েরি ফণিমন ৩৮/ Eyed cat snake (Boiga siamensis) চোখি ফণিমনসা ৩৯/ Common Indian cat snake (Boiga trigonata) পাতি ফণিমনসা ৪০/ Ornate flying snake (Chrysopelea ornata) কালনাগিনী, উড়ুক্কু সাপ ৪১/ Dog-toothed cat snake (Boiga cynodon) বাংলার ফণিমনসা ৪২/ Green cat snake (Boiga cyanea) সবুজ ফণিমনসা ৪৩/ Many spotted cat snake (Boiga multomaculate) চিএিত ফণিমনসা ৪৪/ Banded mangrove snake (Boiga dendrophila) জালি ম্যানগ্রোভ সাপ ৪৫/ Eastern cat snake (Boiga gokool) পূবের ফণিমনসা ৪৬/ Large-nosed vine snake (Ahaetulla nasuta) বড়-নাক লাউডগা সাপ ৪৭/ Short-nosed vine snake (Ahaetulla prasina) ছোট-নাক লাউডগা সাপ ৪৮/ Glossy marsh snake (Gerarda prevostiana) উজ্জ্বল প্যারাবন সাপ ৪৯/ Dussumier's smooth water snake (Enhydris Dussumieri) ডুসুমিরের পাইন্না সাপ ৫০/ Common smooth water snake (Enhydris enhydris) পানি সাপ, পাতি পাইন্না সাপ ৫১/ Siebold's smooth water snake (Enhydris sieboldii) সাইবোল্ডের পাইন্না সাপ ৫২/ Buff stripped keelback (Amphiesma stolatum) দাগি ধোরা সাপ
Views: 4180 Ferdous Salman Tanzil