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How to signal at sea
 
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Flag semaphore is the telegraphy system used to convey information at a distance by means of visual signals with hand-held flags. This system is primarily used by the navy in case of a communications breakdown. Ensign Andrei Zamfir from the Romanian Navy speaks about the uses of the flags and their relevance today. To find out more about the NATO phonetic alphabet, codes and signals, visit: http://bit.ly/alphabetNATO ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ SUBSCRIBE to this channel http://bit.ly/NATOsubscribe SUBSCRIBE to NATO News http://bit.ly/NATONewsSubscribe SUBSCRIBE to NATO History http://bit.ly/NATOHistorySubscribe Connect with NATO online: Visit the Official NATO Homepage: http://bit.ly/NATOhomepage Find NATO on FACEBOOK: http://bit.ly/NATOfacebook Follow @NATO on TWITTER: http://bit.ly/NATOtwitter Follow NATO on Instagram: http://bit.ly/NATOinstagram Find NATO on Google+: http://bit.ly/NATOgoogleplus Find NATO on LinkedIn: http://bit.ly/NATOlinkedin Find NATO on Flickr: http://bit.ly/NATOflickr #NATO #WeAreNATO #OTAN
Views: 2506 NATO
How To Signal At Sea To Other Ships
 
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A short piece on flag semaphore. Flag semaphore is the telegraphy system used to convey information at a distance by means of visual signals with flags. This system is primarily used by the navy in case of a communications breakdown. Footage taken aboard the Romanian Navy ship Regele Ferdinand, a part of Standing NATO Maritime Group 2 (SNMG2), which was taking part in a Passing Exercise in the Black Sea to increase interoperability between British, Romanian and Turkish naval forces. Shots of various flags being displayed and hoisted. Crew sorting flags in storage room. Courtesy Video Natochannel
Maritime Distress Signals as per COLREGS
 
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COLREGS 1972 details list of distress signals to be shown by vessels at sea under Annex IV.
Views: 606 joshy4all
A signalman aboard a US ship underway at sea sending blinker signal at night in t...HD Stock Footage
 
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Link to order this clip: http://www.criticalpast.com/video/65675075949_United-States-signalman_sending-blinker_men-aboard-boat_view-of-sunrise Historic Stock Footage Archival and Vintage Video Clips in HD. A signalman aboard a US ship underway at sea sending blinker signal at night in the United States. US submarines at a harbor in the United States. A ship underway at sea off the coast of United States. Using signal lamp, Signalman aboard the ship is sending morse code blinker at night (though first dawn light of sunrise is visible). Low mountains in the background. Men aboard a boat underway. The sunrise view. (Unrelated: Clip ends with brief view of Kodak "china girl" for color timing. Lettering beside this "china girl" or "leader lady" indicates Kodak 79 ECO and she is wearing a 1960's psychedelic shirt or blouse) Location: United States. Date: 1945. Visit us at www.CriticalPast.com: 57,000+ broadcast-quality historic clips for immediate download. Fully digitized and searchable, the CriticalPast collection is one of the largest archival footage collections in the world. All clips are licensed royalty-free, worldwide, in perpetuity. CriticalPast offers immediate downloads of full-resolution HD and SD masters and full-resolution time-coded screeners, 24 hours a day, to serve the needs of broadcast news, TV, film, and publishing professionals worldwide. Still photo images extracted from the vintage footage are also available for immediate download. CriticalPast is your source for imagery of worldwide events, people, and B-roll spanning the 20th century.
Views: 22601 CriticalPast
How to signal at sea - Broll
 
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A short piece on flag semaphore. Flag semaphore is the telegraphy system used to convey information at a distance by means of visual signals with flags. This system is primarily used by the navy in case of a communications breakdown. Footage taken aboard the Romanian Navy ship Regele Ferdinand, a part of Standing NATO Maritime Group 2 (SNMG2), which was taking part in a Passing Exercise in the Black Sea to increase interoperability between British, Romanian and Turkish naval forces. Credit: Courtesy
Views: 66 Got You
24   sound signals 1
 
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Here are the sound signal rules to be followed by vessels in restricted visibility: A power-driven vessel underway must sound one prolonged blast every two minutes. A power-driven vessel underway but stopped and making no way through the water must sound two prolonged blasts every 2 minutes with an interval of about 2 seconds between them. A vessel not under command; a vessel restricted in her ability to maneuver, whether underway or at anchor; a vessel constrained by her draft; a sailing vessel; a vessel engaged in fishing, whether underway or at anchor; or a vessel engaged in towing or pushing another vessel must sound one prolonged blast plus two short blasts every two minutes. A vessel at anchor must ring the bell rapidly for 5 seconds every one minute. A vessel at anchor of 100 meters or more in length is required to ring the bell rapidly for 5 seconds every one minute, and immediately after the ringing of the bell to sound the gong for 5 seconds in the aft part of the vessel.
Crystal Oscillator Tested At Sea
 
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This is a project that I wanted to test far away from the grid to make sure that it was not being influenced by local area signals or AC power sources. I am at an island located 30 miles out to sea where there is no grid power influence. This project worked exactly like it did ashore. The crystal oscillator is running at 13.56MHz.
Views: 543 Lidmotor
Manoeuvring and Warning Signals | Rule 34 | Sound Signals in Depth
 
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The international regulations for preventing collisions at sea require vessels to indicate their manoeuvres by sounding signals on their whistles. This video looks at rule 34 of the COLREGS. Rule 34 covers manoeuvring and warning signals. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Rule 34: Manoeuvring and warning signals (a) When vessels are in sight of one another, a power-driven vessel underway, when manoeuvring as authorized or required by these Rules, shall indicate that manoeuvre by the following signals on her whistle: ▪ one short blast to mean “I am altering my course to starboard”; ▪ two short blasts to mean “I am altering my course to port”; ▪ three short blasts to mean “I am operating astern propulsion”. (b) Any vessel may supplement the whistle signals prescribed in paragraph (a) of this Rule by light signals, repeated as appropriate, whilst the manoeuvre is being carried out: i. these light signals shall have the following significance ▪ one flash to mean “I am altering my course to starboard”; ▪ two flashes to mean “I am altering my course to port”; ▪ three flashes to mean “I am operating astern propulsion”; ii. the duration of each flash shall be about one second, the interval between flashes shall be about one second, and the interval between successive signals shall be not less than ten seconds; iii. the light used for this signal shall, if fitted, be an all-round white light, visible at a minimum range of 5 miles, and shall comply with the provisions of Annex I to these Regulations. (c) When in sight of one another in a narrow channel or fairway: i. a vessel intending to overtake another shall in compliance with Rule 9(e)(i) indicate her intention by the following signals on her whistle: ▪ two prolonged blasts followed by one short blast to mean “I intend to overtake you on your starboard side”; ▪ two prolonged blasts followed by two short blasts to mean “I intend to overtake you on your port side”. ii. the vessel about to be overtaken when acting in accordance with Rule 9(e)(i) shall indicate her agreement by the following signal on her whistle: ▪ one prolonged, one short, one prolonged and one short blast, in that order. (d) When vessels in sight of one another are approaching each other and from any cause either vessel fails to understand the intentions or actions of the other, or is in doubt whether sufficient action is being taken by the other to avoid collision, the vessel in doubt shall immediately indicate such doubt by giving at least five short and rapid blasts on the whistle. Such signal may be supplemented by a light signal of at least five short and rapid flashes. (e) A vessel nearing a bend or an area of a channel or fairway where other vessels may be obscured by an intervening obstruction shall sound one prolonged blast. Such signal shall be answered with a prolonged blast by any approaching vessel that may be within hearing around the bend or behind the intervening obstruction. (f) If whistles are fitted on a vessel at a distance apart of more than 100 metres, one whistle only shall be used for giving manoeuvring and warning signals. (Text of Rule 34 of the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea, the COLREGS) -------EQUIPMENT I USE TO MAKE VIDEOS------ VSDC Pro Video Editor https://bit.ly/2kE5v8j Microphone: Samson Go Mic (GB) https://amzn.to/2rXaDHM (US) https://amzn.to/2k7HLsT Mic Stand: Desktop Stand (GB) https://amzn.to/2rXVzto (US) https://amzn.to/2Leed9r Computer: Dell Inspiron 7000 Gaming (GB) https://amzn.to/2k8TVBL (US) https://amzn.to/2GAUugM -------------------------DISCLOSURE-------------------------- This description contains affiliate links. These are links that allow me to earn a small commission on the purchases you make. This lets you support the channel at no additional cost to yourself. I will only link to products that I have purchased myself or would be happy to spend my own money on. -------------------------DISCLAIMER-------------------------- All content on this channel is provided for entertainment purposes only. Although every effort has been made to ensure the content is accurate and up to date, it remains the responsibility of the viewer to determine its accuracy and validity. The content should never be used to substitute professional advice or education.
Views: 3415 Casual Navigation
25   sound signals 2
 
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A vessel at anchor may in addition to the bell and/or gong, sound one short, one prolonged and one short blast to give warning of her position, and of the possibility of collision, to an approaching vessel. A vessel aground must ring the bell, and if required, sound the gong, and in addition, must ring three separate and distinct strokes on the bell immediately before and after the rapid ringing of the bell. A vessel of less than 12 meters in length is not obliged to give the previously described signals, but if she does not, shall make some other efficient sound signal at intervals of not more than 2 minutes. A pilot vessel when engaged on pilotage duty shall, in addition to the signals prescribed for power-driven vessels, sound an identity signal consisting of four short blasts.
Colors сигнальные огни
 
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The Marine Safety Act requires that lights must be displayed from sunset to sunrise and in times of restricted visibility during daylight hours. Minimum ranges at which lights can be seen refer to conditions on a dark night with a clear atmosphere. The information in this chapter is based on the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea 1972 (COLREGS), Marine Safety Act and Marine Safety Regulations.
Views: 31574 SpeakSeaStyle
Lights and Shapes Regulations
 
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Lights and Shapes Regulations Don't Forget to Subscribe Us Like Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarineOnlineYoutube Follow Twitter: https://twitter.com/MarineOnlineYou Follow Google+ https://plus.google.com/107450234425940445683 Website: https://marineonlineyou.blogspot.com/
Views: 11485 Marine Online
30   distress signals by radio
 
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The most common way of sending a distress signal is by radio. Modern radios conform to the GMDSS (Global Maritime Distress and Safety System). GMDSS is an international system that uses terrestrial and satellite technology and ship board radio systems to allow rapid response in an emergency situation. Nowadays distress messages can be initiated digitally by pressing the call button on the radio set. Radio sets which are not according to the GMDSS standard transmit a distress message by voice on channel 16 on a VHF transmitter, or on 2182 kHz on an MF transmitter. The reception range of a VHF transmitter to a coastal station averages 35 nautical miles and between an MF transmitter and a coastal station 150 nautical miles. If you or your vessel are in grave and immediate danger use the MAYDAY call. MAYDAY is the internationally recognized radiotelephony distress signal for a person or a vessel in grave and imminent danger.
How Undersea Internet Fiber Optic Cables Are Laid On The Ocean Floor
 
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Laying of cables in the oceans of our world is a fascinating business. Men and women toil long and tedious hours to make this possible. Submarine cables are laid down by using specially-modified ships that carry the submarine cable on board and slowly lay it out on the seabed as per the plans given by the cable operator. The ships can carry with them up to 2,000km-length of cable. Depending on the equipment on-board the cable-ship, the type of plow used, the sea conditions and the ocean-bed where the cable is being laid down, cable ships can do anywhere from 100-150km of cable laying per day. Newer ships and plows now do about 200km of cable laying per day. The cables are specially constructed for submarine operations as they have to endure harsh conditions as well as pressure. Fiber optic cables carry DWDM [Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing] laser signals at a rate of terabytes per second. They use optical repeaters to strengthen the signal which attenuates over long distances. They have a decade lifespan and costs vary (depending on the length of the cable). The typical cost for a project is anywhere from $100m-$500m. We don't use satellites because they can't carry terabytes of data for less than a billion dollars per communication line. The coiling of hundreds of miles of cable in the cargo hold is a process that can take between three to four weeks to complete. Submarine cable laying process starts from the landing station, where a long cable section is attached (connected) to the landing point and then extended out to a few miles in the sea. This end is connected to the cable on the ship and then the ship starts its cable laying process. The process also involves a plow. The cable is not simply left to sit on the ocean bed, but is actually being fed into a plow, that lays the cable into a trench. Depending on where the cable is laid out, the cable coming in from the ocean to the landing station might be advertised or not. Most of the time cable consortium companies try to hide the cable as much as they can, so that only those who need to know – municipalities, port authorities and shipping companies – are informed of the exact route of the cable. When cables are damaged, either divers or specialized small submersibles with cameras and lights are sent down to the seabed to investigate where the cuts are. Then, either the divers or robotic arms on the submersible bring the two ends of the cable to the surface, where they are re-spliced and joined again. Music: Bottom of the Sea (Instrumental Version) by Dhruva Aliman https://dhruvaaliman.bandcamp.com/album/hard-to-get-along http://www.dhruvaaliman.com/
Views: 237622 Wise Wanderer
Flares, Emergency Locator Transmitters, etc.: Aircrew Survival: Survival Signalling c1990 FAA
 
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more at http://outdoor-gear.quickfound.net/ Aircrew Survival: Survival Signalling, Civil Aerospace Medical Institute. Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distress_signal A distress signal is an internationally recognized means for obtaining help. Distress signals take the form of or are commonly made by using radio signals, displaying a visually detected item or illumination, or making an audible sound, from a distance. A distress signal indicates that a person or group of people, ship, aircraft, or other vehicle is threatened by grave and imminent danger and requests immediate assistance. Use of distress signals in other circumstances may be against local or international law... Maritime distress signals Distress signals at sea are defined in the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea and in the International Code of Signals... Aviation distress signals The civilian aircraft emergency frequency for voice distress alerting is 121.5 MHz. Military aircraft use 243 MHz (which is a harmonic of 121.5 MHz, and therefore civilian beacons transmit on this frequency as well). Aircraft can also signal an emergency by setting one of several special transponder codes, such as 7700. The COSPAS/SARSAT signal can be transmitted by an Electronic Locator Transmitter or ELT, which is similar to a marine EPIRB on the 406 MHz radio frequency. (Marine EPIRBS are constructed so as to float while aviation an ELT is constructed so as to be activated by a sharp deceleration and is sometimes referred to as a Crash Position Indicator/CPI). A "triangular distress pattern" is a rarely used flight pattern flown by aircraft in distress but without radio communications. The standard pattern is a series of 120° turns... Ground distress beacons The COSPAS-SARSAT 406 MHz radio frequency distress signal can be transmitted by hikers, backpackers, trekkers, mountaineers and other ground-based remote adventure seekers and personnel working in isolated backcountry areas using a small, portable Personal Locator Beacon or PLB... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distress_radiobeacon Distress radio beacons, also known as emergency beacons, PLB (Personal Locator Beacon), ELT (Emergency Locator Transmitter) or EPIRB (Emergency Position-Indicating Radio Beacon), are tracking transmitters which aid in the detection and location of boats, aircraft, and people in distress. Strictly, they are radiobeacons that interface with worldwide offered service of Cospas-Sarsat, the international satellite system for search and rescue (SAR). When manually activated, or automatically activated upon immersion, such beacons send out a distress signal. The signals are monitored worldwide and the location of the distress is detected by non-geostationary satellites, and can be located by some combination of GPS trilateration and doppler triangulation. The basic purpose of a distress radiobeacon is to help rescuers find survivors within the so-called "golden day" (the first 24 hours following a traumatic event) during which the majority of survivors can usually be saved. Since the inception of Cospas-Sarsat in 1982, distress radiobeacons have assisted in the rescue of over 28,000 people in more than 7,000 distress situations. In 2010 alone, the system provided information which was used to rescue 2,388 persons in 641 distress situations... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flare A flare, also sometimes called a fusee, is a type of pyrotechnic that produces a brilliant light or intense heat without an explosion. Flares are used for signalling, illumination, or defensive countermeasures in civilian and military applications. Flares may be ground pyrotechnics, projectile pyrotechnics, or parachute-suspended to provide maximum illumination time over a large area. Projectile pyrotechnics may be dropped from aircraft, fired from rocket or artillery, or deployed by flare guns or handheld percussive tubes...
Views: 11729 Jeff Quitney
Coast Guard Radio Distress Calls
 
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Distress calls made to Coast Guard Sector Mobile show tense moments during 2015 DI Regatta disaster.
Views: 143719 WKRG
International maritime signal flags and their meaning | nautical alphabet flags | maritime flags
 
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Welcome to my youtube channel             TIDES AND ME In this video i'm going to mention about the maritime navigational flags and its meaning as per International Code of Signals (ICS). According to the ICS, Inside the video I'm going to mention about alphabetical maritime navigational flags and its meaning. 》Flags name  and its Meanings(ICS)《 A Alfa "I have a diver down; keep well clear at slow speed." B Bravo "I am taking in or discharging or carrying dangerous goods." C Charlie "Affirmative." D Delta "Keep clear of me; I am maneuvering with difficulty." E Echo "I am altering my course to starboard." F Foxtrot "I am disabled; communicate with me." G Golf "I require a pilot." By fishing vessels near fishing grounds: "I am hauling nets." H Hotel "I have a pilot on board." I India "I am altering my course to port." J Juliet "I am on fire and have dangerous cargo on board: keep well clear of me." or "I am leaking dangerous cargo." K Kilo "I wish to communicate with you." L Lima In harbour: "The ship is quarantined." At sea: "You should stop your vessel instantly." M Mike "My vessel is stopped and making no way through the water." N November "Negative." O Oscar "Man overboard." P Papa In harbour: All persons should report on board as the vessel is about to proceed to sea. At sea: It may be used by fishing vessels to mean: "My nets have come fast upon an obstruction." Q Quebec "My vessel is 'healthy' and I request free pratique." R Romeo (No ICS meaning as single flag) S Sierra "I am operating astern propulsion." T Tango "Keep clear of me." Fishing boats: "Keep clear of me; I am engaged in pair trawling." U Uniform "You are running into danger." V Victor "I require assistance." W Whiskey "I require medical assistance." X Xray "Stop carrying out your intentions and watch for my signals." Y Yankee "I am dragging my anchor." Z Zulu "I require a tug." By fishing vessels near fishing grounds: "I am shooting nets." YouTube.com/TIDESANDME 》subscribe my channels 》Leave your comments 》Do like and share
Views: 5970 TIDES AND ME
COLREG Rule 34 Signals When In Sight In A Narrow Channel
 
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Extract from RULE 34 Manoeuvring and warning signals (c) When in sight of one another in a narrow channel or fairway: (i) a vessel intending to overtake another shall in compliance with Rule 9 (e) (i) indicate her intention by the following signals on her whistle: two prolonged blasts followed by one short blast to mean ‘! intend to overtake you on your starboard side“; two prolonged blasts followed by two short blasts to mean “1 intend to overtake you on your port side“; (ii) the vessel about to be overtaken when acting in accordance with Rule 9 (e) (i) shall indicate her agreement by the following signal on her whistle: one prolonged, one short, one prolonged and one short blast. in that order. (d) When vessels in sight of one another are approaching each other and from any cause either vessel fails to understand the intentions or actions of the other. or is in doubt whether sufficient action is being taken by the other to avoid collision. the vessel in doubt shall immediately indicate such doubt by giving at least five short and rapid blasts on the whistle. Such signal may be supplemented by a light signal of at least five short and rapid flashes. (f) If whistles are fitted on a vessel at a distance apart of more than 100 meters. one whistle only shall be used for giving manoeuvring and warning signals. Don't Forget to Subscribe Us Like Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarineOnlineYoutube Follow Twitter: https://twitter.com/MarineOnlineYou Follow Google+ https://plus.google.com/107450234425940445683 Website: https://marineonlineyou.blogspot.com/
Views: 1148 Marine Online
Comet - Marine Distress Signal Training Video
 
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Drew Marine Signal & Safety UK Ltd - Comet and Pains Wessex Marine Distress Signals Visit: www.painswessex.com (or) www.comet-marine.com for more details.
Views: 109377 DMSSUK
COLREG Lights, Shapes and Sound Signals
 
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The learning objective of this section is to get acquainted with the different lights, shapes and sound signals that may be used by different types of vessels Lights and shapes Visibility of lights Lights displayed by power-driven vessels underway Lights for vessels towing and pushing Lights for sailing and rowing vessels Lights for fishing vessels Lights for vessels not under command or restricted in their ability to manoeuvre Lights for vessels constrained by their draught Lights for pilot vessels Lights for vessels anchored and aground Lights for seaplanes Definitions of whistle Equipment Manoeuvring and warning signals, using whistle or lights Sound signals to be used in restricted visibility Signals to be used to attract attention Distress signals Annexes ANNEX I – Positioning and technical details of lights and shapes ANNEX II – Additional signals for fishing vessels fishing in close proximity ANNEX III – Technical details of sound signal appliances ANNEX IV – Distress signals COLREG Rule 34 Warning Signals for Vessels In Sight Of Each Other https://youtu.be/dQ1VkgDt1x4 COLREG Rule 34 Signals When In Sight In A Narrow Channel https://youtu.be/8lOk46HFHe4 COLREG Rule 31 Seaplanes And WIG Craft https://youtu.be/7E5v1nSNmDk COLREG Rule 29 & Rule 35 Pilot Vessels On Duty https://youtu.be/HzVKJ9051dM COLREG Rule 27 Vessel Engaged In Mine Clearing Operations https://youtu.be/1G23KnMi66Y COLREG Rule 27 Vessel Engaged In Dredging OR Underwater Operations https://youtu.be/Gfry8xTJiuE COLREG Rule 27 & Rule 35 Vessel Restricted, But Not Mine Clearin https://youtu.be/OJpSE0cbB48 COLREG Rule 27 & Rule 35 Vessel Not Under Command https://youtu.be/8JflJu0Rd1k COLREG Rule 26 & Rule 35 Fishing Vessel Engaged In Trawling https://youtu.be/KEdFc53Czec COLREG Rule 26 & Rule 35 Fishing Vessel Engaged In Fishing Other Than Trawling https://youtu.be/n3PqV9rX7QA COLREG Rule 25 & Rule 35 Sailing Vessels and Vessels Under Oars https://youtu.be/z9rgrVvodZs COLREG Rule 24 Vessel Puching Ahead Or Rowing Other Vessels Alongside https://youtu.be/C1KE9IbQky8 COLREG Rule 24, Rule 27 And Rule 35 A Vessel Engaged In Towing https://youtu.be/kH1ZSgVhvdE COLREG Rule 23 & Rule 35 Power Driven Vessels https://youtu.be/0Jzo3AxowJU COLREG Rule 24 & Rule 35 A Vessel Being Towed https://youtu.be/jFSNvRtP3Ds COLREG Rule 21 & Annex 1 Light And Shapes https://youtu.be/m1Gmh2bJe9w COLREG Rule 20 & 32 Light And Shapes Signals https://youtu.be/P_WAz9cEYKo COLREG Rule 30 And Rule 35 A Vessel At Anchor https://youtu.be/DQz-TvHHobU COLREG Rule 30 A Vessel Aground https://youtu.be/v4FQt2NF6uk Don't Forget to subscribe US Like Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarineOnlineYoutube Follow Twitter: https://twitter.com/MarineOnlineYou Follow Google+ https://plus.google.com/107450234425940445683
Views: 46213 Marine Online
Sound Signals in Restricted Visibility | Rule 35
 
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Rule 35 details sound signals that vessels need to sound when in or near an area of restricted visibility. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Rule 35: Sound signals in restricted visibility In or near an area of restricted visibility, whether by day or night, the signals prescribed in this Rule shall be used as follows: (a) A power-driven vessel making way through the water shall sound at intervals of not more than 2 minutes one prolonged blast. (b) A power-driven vessel underway but stopped and making no way through the water shall sound at intervals of not more than 2 minutes two prolonged blasts in succession with an interval of about 2 seconds between them. (c) A vessel not under command, a vessel restricted in her ability to manoeuvre, a vessel constrained by her draught, a sailing vessel, a vessel engaged in fishing and a vessel engaged in towing or pushing another vessel shall, instead of the signals prescribed in paragraphs (a) or (b) of this Rule, sound at intervals of not more than 2 minutes three blasts in succession, namely one prolonged followed by two short blasts. (d) A vessel engaged in fishing, when at anchor, and a vessel restricted in her ability to manoeuvre when carrying out her work at anchor, shall instead of the signals prescribed in paragraph (g) of this Rule sound the signal prescribed in paragraph (c) of this Rule. (e) A vessel towed or if more than one vessel is towed the last vessel of the tow, if manned, shall at intervals of not more than 2 minutes sound four blasts in succession, namely one prolonged followed by three short blasts. When practicable, this signal shall be made immediately after the signal made by the towing vessel. (f) When a pushing vessel and a vessel being pushed ahead are rigidly connected in a composite unit they shall be regarded as a power-driven vessel and shall give the signals prescribed in paragraphs (a) or (b) of this Rule. (g) A vessel at anchor shall at intervals of not more than one minute ring the bell rapidly for about 5 seconds. In a vessel of 100 metres or more in length the bell shall be sounded in the forepart of the vessel and immediately after the ringing of the bell the gong shall be sounded rapidly for about 5 seconds in the after part of the vessel. A vessel at anchor may in addition sound three blasts in succession, namely one short, one prolonged and one short blast, to give warning of her position and of the possibility of collision to an approaching vessel. (h) A vessel aground shall give the bell signal and if required the gong signal prescribed in paragraph (g) of this Rule and shall, in addition, give three separate and distinct strokes on the bell immediately before and after the rapid ringing of the bell. A vessel aground may in addition sound an appropriate whistle signal. (i) A vessel of 12 metres or more but less than 20 metres in length shall not be obliged to give the bell signals prescribed in paragraphs (g) and (h) of this Rule. However, if she does not, she shall make some other efficient sound signal at intervals of not more than 2 minutes. (j) A vessel of less than 12 metres in length shall not be obliged to give the above-mentioned signals but, if she does not, shall make some other efficient sound signal at intervals of not more than 2 minutes. (k) A pilot vessel when engaged on pilotage duty may in addition to the signals prescribed in paragraphs (a),(b) or (g) of this Rule sound an identity signal consisting of four short blasts. (Text of Rule 35 of the COLREGS, the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea) -------EQUIPMENT I USE TO MAKE VIDEOS------ VSDC Pro Video Editor https://bit.ly/2kE5v8j Microphone: Samson Go Mic (GB) https://amzn.to/2rXaDHM (US) https://amzn.to/2k7HLsT Mic Stand: Desktop Stand (GB) https://amzn.to/2rXVzto (US) https://amzn.to/2Leed9r Computer: Dell Inspiron 7000 Gaming (GB) https://amzn.to/2k8TVBL (US) https://amzn.to/2GAUugM -------------------------DISCLOSURE-------------------------- This description contains affiliate links. These are links that allow me to earn a small commission on the purchases you make. This lets you support the channel at no additional cost to yourself. I will only link to products that I have purchased myself or would be happy to spend my own money on. -------------------------DISCLAIMER-------------------------- All content on this channel is provided for entertainment purposes only. Although every effort has been made to ensure the content is accurate and up to date, it remains the responsibility of the viewer to determine its accuracy and validity. The content should never be used to substitute professional advice or education.
Views: 3440 Casual Navigation
What is GENERAL EMERGENCY SIGNAL? What does GENERAL EMERGENCY SIGNAL mean?
 
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What is GENERAL EMERGENCY SIGNAL? What does GENERAL EMERGENCY SIGNAL mean? GENERAL EMERGENCY SIGNAL meaning - GENERAL EMERGENCY SIGNAL definition - GENERAL EMERGENCY SIGNAL explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ The general emergency signal is a signal used on board ships in times of emergency. The signal is composed of seven or more short blasts followed by one long blast on the ship's whistle and internal alarm system. Within 24 hours of embarkation of all passengers, the crew will conduct a mandatory muster drill in which the General Emergency Signal is sounded. The purpose of the drill is to educate passengers of emergency procedures should an actual emergency occur. The signal alerts passengers of an emergency so that they will begin proper procedures in which all persons collect their life jackets and proceed to their assigned muster stations. There is also an abandon ship alarm which is used should it become necessary to abandon ship, after all other efforts have been exhausted. This signal is given audibly by the ship's Master (aka Captain) over the PA system. It is never given by automatic means or with recorded media. Requirements on General Alarm Systems according to the Safety Of Life At Sea (SOLAS) Convention: 1. General Alarm Systems on the Open Deck of New Cargo and Passenger Ships according to the SOLAS Chapter III, Reg. 6.4.3 and the Life Saving Appliances (LSACode), App. 7, Reg. 7.2 the signals issued via the general alarm system shall be audible in all accommodation and normal working spaces of the crew as well as on the open deck. The sound pressure level shall be in compliance with LSA-Code 7.2.1.2 - “Recognisability of Audible Alarms”- such that the alarm level is 10 dB(A) over the ambient level. It shall be possible to trigger the alarms both via an automatic signal generator or by hand. The alarms may be interrupted temporarily by announcements made over the loudspeaker installation. On the open decks of cargo ships, the signals are triggered by the automatic signal generator and generated by the general alarm system can either be produced by the whistle or by sirens. The sirens shall be located at uniform distances spread over the open deck. It shall be possible to interrupt the driving of the whistle by the automatic signal generator by means of a non-locking pushbutton or a switch or a locking pushbutton. According to SOLAS Ch. 6.4.2 the general alarm system shall be capable of operation from the navigating bridge and also from other “strategic points”. Triggering of the automatic signal generator shall only be provided on the navigating bridge. A “strategic point” has been accurately defined in LSA Code, App. 7.2. General Alarm on the Open Deck and Broadcast Systems (Loudspeaker Installations) on Existing Passenger Ships. The alarm shall be audible in all accommodation spaces, all normal working spaces of the crew and on all open decks, and its sound pressure level shall be at least 75 dB(A) or 10 dB(A) above the ambient noise level (see LSA-Code App.7.2 and IMO Alarm Code, No. 4.11). The accommodation spaces also include the cabins and living areas as well as the public spaces of the passengers.
Views: 2820 The Audiopedia
Position Light - all about the lighting of sea going vessels
 
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The lighting of sea going vessels , the day signal shapes an fog signals. All You shold know about this, we will show You in this video. It is for Your safety at sea.
Views: 24 Förde Video
signal at sea
 
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road junktion
Views: 9 jay20102009
what is holmes signal ?
 
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Containers which have a perforated bottom and a hole at the top are filled with calcium phosphide and calcium carbide. These are thrown into the sea. Water enters the container through the bottom and reacts with calcium carbide and calcium phosphide to give acetylene and phosphine. Phosphine gets ignited spontaneously as it comes in contact with air and also ignites acetylene. Thus a bright red flame is produced which is accompanied by huge smoke due to the burning of phosphine. This serves as a signal to the approaching ships. Prayaag Eduserv focuses to bring out educational digital contents in audio visual e-learning format, which is easy to understand and help the student remember as and when required. It relieves the student from cramming, memorizing the school text books.We thereby meet the unmet need of learning the school curriculum in multimedia format which makes the student motivated to learn deeper with ease, instead of learn by route. Our ultimate vision is to trigger creative imagination of the students to learn the content with enthusiasm. With the above mission in mind, we ventured to create Audio Visual Content for Tamilnadu State Board +2 Science & Mathematics. Each subject is given with animations, graphics, images, videos to help the students understand in a simple way. Number of academic experts who are leaders in the respective subjects worked hours &hours with visual communication technology experts to bring about an excellent collaborativeproject of educational ecosystem to achieve the best exam results. The DVDs are easy to use and hence the students enjoy learning. We have included Multiple Choice Questions (MCQ), Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) plus solved Board Exam papers. To start with, we brought out Physics, Chemistry, Biology &Maths for +2 Tamilnadu State Board Syllabus in English. Soon we will have Physics, Chemistry Biology &Maths for +2 TN State Board Tamil medium students, as well. This long journey only just started. Our management is not only focused on the exam results but also on mind development of the students. As we progress we will bring out educational DVD's for +1 and 10th standard students for Tamilnadu State Board.The passion to benefit all the stakeholders including parents, students and teachers, driven us to center our attention on the art and the science of delivering client-delight. The unique feature of our DVD content is our natural,easy to understand voiceover which reflects closely the contents as mentioned in the respective text books and also explains the visual images very clearly. It is our endeavor and hope that all our efforts will help the students achieve their Educational Goal and also build job oriented career by preparing the students for engineering and other professional courses. Please contact us immediately to get your FREE sample of DVDs. [email protected] Or [email protected]
Views: 47032 Prayaag Eduserv
"Image Theater" performance of Annie Dillard's "Signals at Sea"
 
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This is a performance of Annie Dillard's poem (which you can read at http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88/dillard.html) using an adaptation of Augusto Boal's "Image Theater," in which one creates "tableaux" or "body pictures" to represent important moments.
Views: 1349 Michael Sherry
Pains Wessex - Safety At Sea Into
 
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Drew Marine Signal & Safety UK Ltd - Comet and Pains Wessex Marine Distress Signals Visit: www.painswessex.com (or) www.comet-marine.com for more details.
Views: 942 DMSSUK
Marine Safety MED A2 Course, Fire Fighting, Life Raft Use, Distress Signals
 
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The Canadian MED A2 is your Course for Safety at sea for Passenger-Carrying Vessels. Recommended for officers and crew of small commercial passenger vessels. Topics covered include marine hazards and emergencies, emergency preparedness and response, fighting shipboard fires, sea survival, distress signals, inspection and maintenance of emergency equipment and passenger control in emergency situations.
Views: 4619 Psycho Skipper
U.S. NAVY SIGNAL CORPS FLAG SEMAPHORE /  BLINKER / MORSE CODE TRAINING FILM  85664
 
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This fascinating 1943 U.S. Navy training film shows "How to Signal" using flag hoists, semaphore, and blinker to present morse code messages. The film was produced by F.H. Hargove of the Prior Motion Picture Company in New York and supposedly narrated by "Radcliffe Hall" (like a pseudonym for a radio announcer). A review in "Motor Boating" magazine noted that "the film shows pictorially how to learn the codes in the International Flag, Semaphore and Blinker systems of Communication. Expert signal men in the U.S. service serve as instructors and demonstrate the correct methods of using these three methods. It is designed so that the film may be repeated again and again until the student becomes familiar with the signal flags and positions of the semaphore, and the light flashes of the blinker…" Flag semaphore is the telegraphy system conveying information at a distance by means of visual signals with hand-held flags, rods, disks, paddles, or occasionally bare or gloved hands. Information is encoded by the position of the flags; it is read when the flag is in a fixed position. Semaphores were adopted and widely used (with hand-held flags replacing the mechanical arms of shutter semaphores) in the maritime world in the 19th century.[citation needed] It is still used during underway replenishment at sea and is acceptable for emergency communication in daylight or, using lighted wands instead of flags, at night. The use of lights for spelling out messages in Morse code dates back to 1867. With the advent of electric lights in the 1890s, the "blinker light" became an effective tool for signaling. Most widely used by naval ships, blinker lights were essential for merchant ships sailing in wartime convoys and observing radio silence. Blinker has remained a useful backup for merchant vessels, and until the late 1980s deck officers were trained in its use. Usually however, blinker work was done by the Radio Officer. Beginning in the 1930s, both civilian and military pilots were required to be able to use Morse code, both for use with early communications systems and for identification of navigational beacons which transmitted continuous two- or three-letter identifiers in Morse code. Aeronautical charts show the identifier of each navigational aid next to its location on the map. Radio telegraphy using Morse code was vital during World War II, especially in carrying messages between the warships and the naval bases of the belligerents. Long-range ship-to-ship communication was by radio telegraphy, using encrypted messages, because the voice radio systems on ships then were quite limited in both their range and their security. Radiotelegraphy was also extensively used by warplanes, especially by long-range patrol planes that were sent out by those navies to scout for enemy warships, cargo ships, and troop ships. Morse code is a method of transmitting text information as a series of on-off tones, lights, or clicks that can be directly understood by a skilled listener or observer without special equipment. The International Morse Code encodes the ISO basic Latin alphabet, some extra Latin letters, the Arabic numerals and a small set of punctuation and procedural signals (prosigns) as standardized sequences of short and long signals called "dots" and "dashes", or "dits" and "dahs", as in amateur radio practice. Because many non-English natural languages use more than the 26 Roman letters, extensions to the Morse alphabet exist for those languages. Each Morse code symbol represents either a text character (letter or numeral) or a prosign and is represented by a unique sequence of dots and dashes. The duration of a dash is three times the duration of a dot. Each dot or dash is followed by a short silence, equal to the dot duration. The letters of a word are separated by a space equal to three dots (one dash), and the words are separated by a space equal to seven dots. The dot duration is the basic unit of time measurement in code transmission. To increase the speed of the communication, the code was designed so that the length of each character in Morse varies approximately inversely to its frequency of occurrence in English. Thus the most common letter in English, the letter "E", has the shortest code, a single dot. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 26902 PeriscopeFilm
Marine Sound Signals
 
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Basic Boating sound signals for recreational boaters
Views: 24695 captnmike11
Flag Alphabet  ~ International maritime signal flags
 
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International maritime signal flags ~ Flag Alphabet The system of international maritime signal flags is one system of flag signals representing individual letters of the alphabet in signals to or from ships. It is a component of the International Code of Signals (ICS).[1] Naval flag signalling undoubtably developed in antiquity in order to coordinate naval action of multiple vessels. In the Peloponnesian War (431 -- 401 BCE) squadrons of Athenian galleys were described by Thucydides as engaging in coordinated maneuvers which would have required some kind of communication;[1] there is no record of how such communication was done but flags would have been the most likely method. Flags have long been used to identify a ship's owner or nationality, or the commander of a squadron. But the use of flags for signalling messages long remained primitive, as indicated by the 1530 instruction that when the Admiral doth doth shote of a pece of Ordnance, and set up his Banner of Council on Starrborde bottocke of his Shippe, everie shipps capten shall with spede go aborde the Admyrall to know his will.[2] Several wars with the Dutch in the 17th century prompted the English to issue instructions for the conduct of particular fleets, such as (in 1673) the Duke of York's "Instructions for the better Ordering of His Majesties Fleet in Sayling". Signals were primitive and rather ad hoc ("As soon as the Admiral shall loose his fore-top and fire a gun..."), and generally a one-way communication system, as only flagships carried a complete set of flags. In 1790 Admiral Lord Howe issued a new signal book for a numerary system using numeral flags to signal a number; the number, not the mast from which the flags flew, indicated the message. Other admirals tried various systems; it was not until 1799 that the Admiralty issued a standardized signal code system for the entire Royal Navy. This was limited to only the signals listed in the Signal-Book. In 1800 Captain Sir Home Popham devised a means of extending this: signals made with a special "Telegraph" flag refererred to a separate dictionary of numbered words and phrases.[3] A similar system was devised by Captain Marryat in 1817 "for the use of vessels employed in the merchant service".[4] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_maritime_signal_flags Semaphore Flags : Semaphore Flags is the system for conveying information at a distance by means of visual signals with hand-held flags, rods, disks, paddles, or occasionally bare or gloved hands. Information is encoded by the position of the flags; it is read when the flag is in a fixed position. Semaphores were adopted and widely used (with hand-held flags replacing the mechanical arms of shutter semaphores) in the maritime world in the 19th century.[citation needed] It is still used during underway replenishment at sea and is acceptable for emergency communication in daylight or, using lighted wands instead of flags, at night.[citation needed] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semaphore VIdeo produced and copyright to Robert Nichol 2013
Flare Shot
 
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Safety at Sea. Safety at Sea. Safety at sea.
Views: 18428 adrian pasdar
sound and light signal (SOLAS)
 
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This video show the sound and light information in voyage the vessel.
Views: 17795 Ahmad Albab Happy
Fog Signal:  Vessel Aground in Restricted Visibility
 
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Video animation to show the sound signals made by a vessel over 100m aground in restricted visibility (fog). The signal is 3 distinct strokes on the bell, followed by a rapid ringing on the bell for about five seconds, followed by 3 more strokes; all followed by rapidly striking a gong for about five seconds. The bell is located in the forepart of the vessel, the gong aft. Also shown are the relevant lights and day shapes. Full details: http://sailskills.co.uk/colregs/Sailskills_signals_fog_signals_anchored_&_aground.html
Views: 6141 P J
Rules & Signals
 
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Rules & Signals, the learning tool and memory jotter for those at sea. From Imray and Tucabo. Rules of the Road, boat lights and markings, buoys, sounds, flags, distress communications and rescue. Full reference plus learning tools. Get it in iTunes http://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewSoftware?id=315649961&mt=8
Views: 923 TucaboSailing
Titanic - CQD Signal on the Sea
 
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CQD Signal on the Sea (The Ballad of Jack Phillips and Harold Bride) On the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the Titanic disaster. Written and performed by Frank Davis, St.John's NL Bass by Don Pennell, St.John's NL
Views: 8500 frank davis
COLREG Rule 30 And Rule 35 A Vessel At Anchor
 
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RULE 30 Anchored vessels and vessels aground (a) A vessel at anchor shall exhibit where lt can best be seen: (i) in the fore part. an all-round white light or one ball; (ll) at or near the stern and at a lower level than the light prescribed in sub-paragraph (i). an all-round white light. (b) A vessel of less than 50 meters in length may exhibit an all-round white light where it can be seen instead of the lights prescribed in paragraph (a) of this Rule. (c) A vessel at anchor may, and a vessel 07 100 meters and more in length shall, also use the available working or equivalent lights to illuminate her decks. (d) A vessel aground shall exhibit the lights prescribed in paragraph (a) or (b) of this Rule and in addition, where they can best be seen: (i) two all-round red lights ln a vertical line; (ii) three balls in a vertical line. (e) A vessel of less than 7 meters in length, when at anchor. not in or near a narrow channel.fairway or anchorage, or where other vessels normally navigate. shall not be required to exhibit the lights or shape prescribed in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this Rule. (f) A vessel of less than 12 meters in length when aground. shall not be required to exhibit the lights or shapes prescribed ln sub-paragraphs (d) (i) and (ll) of this Rule. RULE 35 Sound signals in restricted visibility In or near an area of restricted visibility, whether by day or night. the signals prescribed in this Rule shall be used as follows: (g) A vessel at anchor shall at intervals of not more than one minute ring the bell rapidly for about 5 seconds. In a vessel of 300 meters or more in length the bell shall be sounded in the forepart of the vessel and immediately after the ringing of the bell the gong shall be sounded rapidly for about 5 seconds in the after part of the vessel. A vessel at anchor may in addition sound three blasts in succession. namely one short. one prolonged and one short blast. to give warning of her position and of the possibility of collision to an approaching vessel. (h) A vessel aground shall give the bell signal and it required the gong signal prescribed ln paragraph (g) of this Rule and shall. in addition, give three separate and distinct stroked on the bell immediately before and after the rapid ringing of the bell. A vessel aground may in addition sound an appropriate whistle signal Don't Forget to Subscribe Us Like Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarineOnlineYoutube Follow Twitter: https://twitter.com/MarineOnlineYou Follow Google+ https://plus.google.com/107450234425940445683 Website: https://marineonlineyou.blogspot.com/
Views: 2052 Marine Online
Rules of the Road Review
 
01:20:48
This video gives a review of the Rules of the Road International and Inland for captain license candidates. It covers Rule 1 through 37 in detail. Rules of the Road make up one module of the captains license course. The captains license course is offered by US Captains Training online and in a classroom. The master captains license course is USCG approved.
Views: 221214 US Captains Training
Castaway screams for help
 
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A 2001 Japanese commercial for Zebra. Lost at sea ? Get your signals ready ! More commercials : http://www.youtube.com/CulturePub .. All rights reserved. For all inquiries on commercial use of above video, please mail to [email protected]
Views: 3618 The Ad Show
Vessel Lights - Self Testing
 
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More tools on http://allships.com.au Vessel lights self-testing video slides for helping you to prepare for coxswain/master exams and orals. Just guess the object and wait for answer.
Views: 67196 Femaso
Sea of Signals - Fredericton, NB (Metal / Hardcore / Prog Core)
 
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Sea of Signals at Reads, Fredericton, NB. 11/18/17
Views: 91 Aaron Doucette
Wooing by Weapons What Washington Signals by approving sale of armed Sea Guardian drones to India
 
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Amidst the panic over the future of the Atlantic alliance and the furore over the Trump-Putin Helsinki bromance, a small but significant news item has gone virtually unnoticed. The quietly announced US approval for the sale of unmanned combat aerial vehicles (UCAV) to India has acknowledged India’s strategic autonomy while underscoring its value as an ally against rising China. With the Sea Guardian drone sale under its belt, India may now be allowed to purchase the Russian anti-missile defence system when senior US officials arrive in Delhi for the 2+2 meeting on September 6. Of course, in the Trump era, a month is an eternity and things could change with a single tweet. Indeed, both of the previously scheduled 2+2 meetings were cancelled last minute, first when then secretary of state Rex Tillerson was fired (by tweet) and later when his replacement was unexpectedly dispatched to Pyongyang. But the fact that the US appears inclined to accommodate India – evident in the sale of the previously denied armed Sea Guardian drone (a weapon previously sold only to Nato allies) – hopefully marks a lasting shift, matching America’s growing anxiety about China. In a way, debate over the acquisition of the UCAV has become intertwined with India’s quest for “strategic autonomy”. India has increasingly looked at drones to protect its borders and vast coast line. The 26/11 Mumbai attack by the sea-borne Pakistani terrorists remains a vivid reminder of India’s vulnerabilities. The threat from the sea has grown since with the increased Chinese naval presence in the Indian Ocean. The acquisition of the Sea Guardian (the naval variant of the MQ-9B Reaper) drone would afford India the means to address this vulnerability. But the sale is contingent on India signing the Communications Compatibility and Security Agreement (COMCASA) – namely, the encrypted data and communication system needed to operate the US-supplied weapons and allow interoperability. Earlier India balked at signing this for fear of opening up its secure communication systems to Washington and compromising its strategic autonomy. According to reports, this concern has been addressed with the US agreeing to have the communications link apply only to US-supplied weapons. Resolution of the communications hurdle also raises the possibility that Washington would agree to a waiver on mandated sanctions against India for its planned purchase of Russia’s S-400 system. Under the Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act, sanctions are automatically imposed on countries acquiring weapons from some Russian state-controlled defence firms. However, given the fact that both defence secretary Jim Mattis and secretary of state Mike Pompeo have urged Congress to issue national security waivers, and that both Democrats and Republicans are concerned about winning over countries against China, there is a good chance that India, Indonesia and Vietnam will be granted waivers. Although feelings are running high against Russia for its past and present interference in US elections, worries about China could outweigh concerns about Russian military sales to friendly countries. While President Donald Trump has upended the decades-old Western alliance through his transactional approach, and angered Nato by currying favour with Putin, India has managed to stay above the fray. With the exception of a minor spat over US tariffs on Indian steel and aluminium exports, India has managed to avoid featuring in Trump’s Twitter rants. Seen by the entire Washington establishment as a friendly power and an increasingly solid customer for US military hardware (the purchase of 22 Sea Guardian drones at $2-3 billion could create 2,000 American jobs), India finds itself in a calmer spot in the Trump-induced turbulence. The fact that Washington is wooing India by opening its hitherto prohibited military store does increase the prospect of angering China but by the same token increases India’s leverage. Through lucky convergence, Source :- Blogs TNN - Nayan Chanda Background Music :- bensound.com Disclaimer- This channel is for defence related news worldwide . We try to give you true news related to each and every aspects of defence . It is either country, defence weapon, air Force, army ,navy, military or anything we will try to fully explain . The content specially news we upload are taken from various news channels and media houses . we never claim it is 100 % on our behalf but we try to deliver you exact without rumours . our news is specially related to india . As India is a growing country specially in defence under narendra modi BJP government . Channel Link: https://www.youtube.com/DefenceTube Facebook Link: https://www.facebook.com/defencetube Twitter Link : https://twitter.com/DefenceTube Check my all playlist : https://www.youtube.com/defencetube/playlist
Views: 1632 Defence Tube
Benefits for Humanity: Found at Sea
 
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The Vessel-ID System investigation on the International Space Station demonstrated the ability for a space-based radio receiver to track a ship’s Automatic Identification System (AIS) signal, the marine equivalent of the air traffic control system. Since being turned on in 2010, Vessel-ID has been able to relay more than 400,000 ship position reports from more than 22,000 ships in a single day, proving a quantum leap in the ship tracking ability of coast guards around the world. This ability, coupled with multiple AIS tracking satellites launched since, is already making travel among the waves safer for thousands of ships around the globe. The ship identification and tracking system technology already aided in orienting rescue services for a lone survivor stranded in the North Sea, giving new hope to once impossible situations. For more information: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/experiments/750.html https://archive.org/details/ISS-Benefits-For-Humanity_Found-at-Sea
Views: 24180 NASA Johnson
Vessel Collision Case Study 1
 
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In this video will describe a real life maritime incident and explain the chain of events leading to a collision. it will highlight the rules of the Road being applied to the-situation and provide an opinion regarding the responsibility of each party involved an opinion regard the responsibility of each party involved in the collision. COLREG Rule 34 Warning Signals for Vessels In Sight Of Each Other https://youtu.be/dQ1VkgDt1x4 COLREG Rule 34 Signals When In Sight In A Narrow Channel https://youtu.be/8lOk46HFHe4 COLREG Rule 31 Seaplanes And WIG Craft https://youtu.be/7E5v1nSNmDk COLREG Rule 29 & Rule 35 Pilot Vessels On Duty https://youtu.be/HzVKJ9051dM COLREG Rule 27 Vessel Engaged In Mine Clearing Operations https://youtu.be/1G23KnMi66Y COLREG Rule 27 Vessel Engaged In Dredging OR Underwater Operations https://youtu.be/Gfry8xTJiuE COLREG Rule 27 & Rule 35 Vessel Restricted, But Not Mine Clearin https://youtu.be/OJpSE0cbB48 COLREG Rule 27 & Rule 35 Vessel Not Under Command https://youtu.be/8JflJu0Rd1k COLREG Rule 26 & Rule 35 Fishing Vessel Engaged In Trawling https://youtu.be/KEdFc53Czec COLREG Rule 26 & Rule 35 Fishing Vessel Engaged In Fishing Other Than Trawling https://youtu.be/n3PqV9rX7QA COLREG Rule 25 & Rule 35 Sailing Vessels and Vessels Under Oars https://youtu.be/z9rgrVvodZs COLREG Rule 24 Vessel Puching Ahead Or Rowing Other Vessels Alongside https://youtu.be/C1KE9IbQky8 COLREG Rule 24, Rule 27 And Rule 35 A Vessel Engaged In Towing https://youtu.be/kH1ZSgVhvdE COLREG Rule 23 & Rule 35 Power Driven Vessels https://youtu.be/0Jzo3AxowJU COLREG Rule 24 & Rule 35 A Vessel Being Towed https://youtu.be/jFSNvRtP3Ds COLREG Rule 21 & Annex 1 Light And Shapes https://youtu.be/m1Gmh2bJe9w COLREG Rule 20 & 32 Light And Shapes Signals https://youtu.be/P_WAz9cEYKo COLREG Rule 30 And Rule 35 A Vessel At Anchor https://youtu.be/DQz-TvHHobU COLREG Rule 30 A Vessel Aground https://youtu.be/v4FQt2NF6uk Don't Forget to subscribe US Like Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarineOnlineYoutube Follow Twitter: https://twitter.com/MarineOnlineYou Follow Google+ https://plus.google.com/107450234425940445683
Views: 10819 Marine Online
COLREG Rule 34 Signals To Attract Attention
 
01:36
Extract from RULE 36 Signals to attract attention If necessary to attract the attention of another vessel any vessel may make light or sound signals that cannot be mistaken for any signal authorized elsewhere in these Rules. or may direct the beam at her searchlight in the direction or the danger. in such a way as not to embarrass any vessel. Any light to attract the attention of another vessel shall be such that it cannot be mistaken for any aid to navigation. For the purpose of this Rule the use at high intensity intermittent or revolving lights. such as strobe lights. shall be avowed. Don't Forget to Subscribe Us Like Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarineOnlineYoutube Follow Twitter: https://twitter.com/MarineOnlineYou Follow Google+ https://plus.google.com/107450234425940445683 Website: https://marineonlineyou.blogspot.com/
Views: 579 Marine Online
Soft Cotton County - This Island In The Sea Of Signals
 
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This Island In The Sea Of Signals by Soft Cotton County from the album Soft Cotton County Released 2010-05-28 on 5000records Soft Cotton County – originally a quality clothing brand, now dreamy melodies and dark sentiments: slow-burning ambient pop with a nod to folk music – sometimes retro, sometimes enigmatic – mellow and surreal – a vanilla smoothie washing down your pepper salad. Imagine this is vinyl – vinyl with a gatefold sleeve. You can read this on your lap with the sun slanting through the windows on a Saturday morning – or late at night, with the headphones, while they’re asleep upstairs and the tele's playing a silent film, an instant video for your LP. Welcome to SCC - My name is Rita - fly me. © ℗ . This is officially licensed content, not a copyright infringement. For any issues, please get in touch with finetunes first.
Union Pacific Trains "Along The Salton Sea" -  Old SP Searchlight Signals Included
 
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Watch in HD!! Took another trip out to the desert along Union Pacific's Yuma Sub in Nov 2016. I pretty much explored the whole section of the line that runs along the Salton Sea this go around... from the town of Niland up to Mecca. I found that once you get about halfway up the Sea, in the Northwest direction, some cool vintage Southern Pacific stuff starts popping up! First you come across an old SP steel trestle bridge, followed next by several old searchlight signal control points, and then finally a cantilever signal bridge. It's nice to still see some vintage stuff out there in 2016 (for now at least). I spent most the day out here, the traffic on the line was about average. Last time I went on a Saturday it was heavy! Got some Norfolk Southern and CSX foreign power too! Train #1... UP 7381 East at English Rd. Train #2... UP 8200 West at English Rd. leading a massive manifest. Train #3... UP 7626 West at Hot Mineral Spa Rd. Train #4... UP 2539 East at Hot Mineral Spa Rd. Train #5... UP 5071 West across the SP bridge with a friendly crew! Train #6... UP 5313 East at Mortmar. Train #7... NS 1058 West at Mecca hauling some serious ass! Nice crew too! Train #8... UP 7891 East at Cleveland St. Train #9... UP 7990 West powers off the siding at Mortmar. Train #10... UP 2540 West near Bombay Beach with another nice crew! Train #11... UP 7833 West at Bombay Beach. Train #12... UP 7989 East at Niland. Train #13... UP 7402 East at Niland. Train #14... UP 5367 West at Niland. Train #15... UP 8915 West at Niland. Train #16... UP 2685 at Niland, coming off Yuma Sub heading towards El Centro. Train #17... UP 8065 East at Niland. Thanks for Watching! AmtrakCal462
Views: 5677 AmtrakCal462
COLREG Rule 34 Warning Signals for Vessels In Sight Of Each Other
 
05:03
Extract from RULE 34 Manoeuvring and warming signals (a) When vessels are in sight of one another, a power-driven vessel underway, when maneuvering as authorized or required by these Rules, shall “1le that manoeuvre by the following signals on her whistle: one short blast to mean “1 am altering my course to starboard”; two short blasts to mean “l am altering my course to port”; three short blasts to mean “I am operating astern propulsion“. (b) Any vessel may supplement the whistle signals prescribed in paragraph (a) of this Rule by light signals, repeated as appropriate, whilst the manoeuvre is being carried out: (i) these light signals shall have the following significance: one flash to mean ‘1 am altering my course to starboard“; two flashes to mean “I am altering my course to port“; three flashes to mean ‘I am operating astern propulsion“; (ii) the duration of each flash shall be about one second, the interval between flashes shall be about one second, and the interval between successive signals shall be not less than ten seconds; (iii) the light used for this signal shall, if fitted, be an all-round white light, visible at a minimum range of 5 miles, and shall comply with the provisions of Annex I to these Regulations. (7) If whistles are fitted on a vessel at a distance apart of more than 100 meters, one whistle only shall be used for giving maneuvering and warning signals. Extract from Annex 1 Manoeuvrlng light Not withstanding the provisions of paragraph 2 (f) of this Annex the maneuvering light described in Rule 34 (b) shall be placed in the same fore and aft vertical plane as the masthead light or lights and. where practicable. at a minimum height of 2 meters vertically above the forward masthead light. provided that it shall be carried not less than 2 meters vertically above or below the after masthead light. On a vessel where only one masthead light is carried the maneuvering light, it fitted. shall be carried where it can best be seen. not less than 2 meters vertically apart from the masthead light. Don't Forget to Subscribe Us Like Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarineOnlineYoutube Follow Twitter: https://twitter.com/MarineOnlineYou Follow Google+ https://plus.google.com/107450234425940445683 Website: https://marineonlineyou.blogspot.com/
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Mystirious signals in the glowing sea
 
27:24
Once I extended the relay dishes my radio picked up 3 signals. I should investigate